Josef Mengele Channeled by Karl Mollison 23Jan2022

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Josef Mengele Channeled by Karl Mollison 23Jan2022

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josef_Mengele

Josef Mengele 16 March 1911 – 7 February 1979, also known as the Angel of Death (German: Todesengel), was a German Schutzstaffel (SS) officer and physician during World War II.

He is mainly remembered for his actions at the Auschwitz concentration camp, where he performed deadly experiments on prisoners, was a member of the team of doctors who selected victims to be killed in the gas chambers and was one of the doctors who administered the gas.

With Red Army troops sweeping through German-occupied Poland, Mengele was transferred 280 kilometres (170 mi) from Auschwitz to the Gross-Rosen concentration camp on 17 January 1945, ten days before the arrival of the Soviet forces at Auschwitz.

Before the war, Mengele had received doctorates in anthropology and medicine, and began a career as a researcher. He joined the Nazi Party in 1937 and the SS in 1938.

He was assigned as a battalion medical officer at the start of World War II, then transferred to the Nazi concentration camps service in early 1943 and assigned to Auschwitz, where he saw the opportunity to conduct genetic research on human subjects. His experiments focused primarily on twins, with no regard for the health or safety of the victims.

After the war, Mengele fled to South America. He sailed to Argentina in July 1949, assisted by a network of former SS members. He initially lived in and around Buenos Aires, then fled to Paraguay in 1959 and Brazil in 1960, all the while being sought by West Germany, Israel, and Nazi hunters such as Simon Wiesenthal, who wanted to bring him to trial.

Mengele eluded capture in spite of extradition requests by the West German government and clandestine operations by the Israeli intelligence agency Mossad. He drowned in 1979 after suffering a stroke while swimming off the coast of Bertioga, and was buried under the false name of Wolfgang Gerhard. 

His remains were disinterred and positively identified by forensic examination in 1985.

Dr. Frank Stranges Channeled by Karl Mollison 16Jan2022

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Dr. Frank Stranges Channeled by Karl Mollison 16Jan2022

From Amazon & http://nextagemission.com/OSF/FS_FrankStranges_HisBackground.html

Dr. Frank Stranges was born and educated in Brooklyn, New York. He received his Bachelors of Divinity, as well as Ph.D’s in Psychology and Philosophy, from Faith Theological Seminary in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Dr. Stranges was a member of the Mayor’s Advisory Council of Los Angeles, and a member of the American Association for Social Psychology. He also held a Ph.D. from the National Institute of Criminology, in Washington, D.C., and was an accredited Diplomat of the American Academy of Professional Arts.

Dr. Stranges authored several books on scientific and religious subjects, including his classic “The Stranger at the Pentagon,” which tells the unusual story of a spaceman named Valiant Thor. Because Thor was a real person, who appeared in a public on a few occasions (including at the United Nations headquarters in New York City), the legend of the Stranger at the Pentagon has grown, becoming a real head-scratcher for 21st-century UFO researchers. Today, it is still one of the hottest topics in ufology, having spawned various other books, documentaries, and even feature Hollywood films.

What exactly happened to Valiant Thor? Did he get back on his spaceship and return to his home planet, or did he help the U.S. government set up alien-human hybrid experimentation in remote underground bases? Or was he imprisoned – thrown in the clink – by those in the government who have been fighting UFO Disclosure all these years?

Since no one knows how long an alien can live, could Valiant Thor still be alive today, in 2016, somewhere in – or under – our nation’s capitol?

This special reprint – the 6th revised edition from 2001 – features an introduction by Dr. Harley Byrd, nephew of Adm. Richard E. Byrd, and an epilogue by Valiant Thor himself, as well as several interesting photos, covering years of UFO history. A must-have for the serious paranormal researcher.

Dr. Frank E. Stranges, founder of NICUFO (National Investigations Committee on UFO’S), passed away on November 17, 2008 in California. Holding degrees in Theology, Psychology and Criminology, Dr. Frank always had a keen interest in the Bible and UFOS’ and dedicated his life to teaching and counseling people throughout the world to live in Divine Spirit. He offered a monthly newsletter, The Interspace Link and created the international “Inner Circle”, where members benefitted from his spiritual teachings and information that he gathered from those of other worlds, especially those beings from the planet Venus.

In 1959 Dr. Frank had his first physical encounter with Commander Valiant Thor, a Venusian. This friendship was to deepen throughout Dr. Frank’s life on earth. His book, Stranger at the Pentagon explains the details of his encounters and Dr. Frank’s subsequent activities.

His most recent work was the making of a DVD trilogy entitled Mysteries of the Dead Sea Scrolls Exposed. He often stated that the information contained within the Dead Sea Scrolls is of immense value to the public because it reveals the direct link between the words of Jesus and the existence of beings from other worlds.

One of Dr. Frank’s last sentences delivered to the Inner Circle before his passing was: “I will remain in His Service, from wherever I may be.”

May the winds of love continue to sweep you upwards, Dr. Frank.

GetWisdom.com Webinar: Retrocausal Healing — When Healing the Past or Future Heals the Present 09Jan2022

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GetWisdom.com Webinar:  Retrocausal Healing — When Healing the Past or Future Heals the Present 09Jan2022

About The Webinar

  • Can healing occur before the healing session is actually carried out?
  • Can praying in the future heal today’s illness?
  • Can healing be done in past lifetimes to heal current troubles and illnesses?
  • How can someone avoid death in the present by praying for safety in the future, which hasn’t happened yet?​​​​​​​
    ​​​​​​​
    Creator demystifies the quantum phenomena surrounding the ability to change things across time domains, and why this is the key to empowering healing efforts.

Pliny the Younger Channeled by Karl Mollison 02Jan2022

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Pliny the Younger Channeled by Karl Mollison 02Jan2022

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pliny_the_Younger

Pliny the Younger 61 – c. 113 was a lawyer, author, and magistrate of Ancient Rome. Pliny’s uncle, Pliny the Elder, helped raise and educate him.

Pliny the Younger wrote hundreds of letters, of which 247 survive, and which are of great historical value. Some are addressed to reigning emperors or to notables such as the historian Tacitus.

Pliny served as an imperial magistrate under Trajan (reigned 98–117) and his letters to Trajan provide one of the few surviving records of the relationship between the imperial office and provincial governors.

Pliny rose through a series of civil and military offices, the cursus honorum. He was a friend of the historian Tacitus and might have employed the biographer Suetonius on his staff. Pliny also came into contact with other well-known men of the period, including the philosophers Artemidorus and Euphrates the Stoic, during his time in Syria.

Pliny the Younger, the Roman governor of Bithynia and Pontus (now in modern Turkey) wrote a letter to Emperor Trajan around AD 112 and asked for counsel on dealing with the early Christian community. The letter (Epistulae X.96) details an account of how Pliny conducted trials of suspected Christians who appeared before him as a result of anonymous accusations and asks for the Emperor’s guidance on how they should be treated.

Neither Pliny nor Trajan mentions the crime that Christians had committed, except for being a Christian; and other historical sources do not provide a simple answer to what that crime could be, but most likely due to the stubborn refusal of Christians to worship Roman gods; making them appear as objecting to Roman rule.

Pliny states that he gives Christians multiple chances to affirm they are innocent and if they refuse three times, they are executed.

Pliny states that his investigations have revealed nothing on the Christians’ part but harmless practices and “depraved, excessive superstition.” However, Pliny seems concerned about the rapid spread of their practices and views Christian gatherings as a potential starting point for sedition.

The letter is the first pagan account to refer to Christianity, providing key information on early Christian beliefs and practices and how these were viewed and dealt with by the Romans. The letter and Trajan’s reply indicate that at the time of its writing there was no systematic and official persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire. 

There was persecution of Christians before this but only on a local basis, like the Neronian persecution in Rome or the expulsion of Jewish-Christians and Jews from Rome by order of Claudius. Trajan’s reply also offers valuable insight into the relationship between Roman provincial governors and Emperors and indicates that at the time Christians were not sought out or tracked down by imperial orders, and that persecutions could be local and sporadic.

George Harrison Channeled by Karl Mollison 26Dec2021

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George Harrison Channeled by Karl Mollison 26Dec2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Harrison

George Harrison 25 February 1943 – 29 November 2001 was an English musician, singer-songwriter, and music and film producer who achieved international fame as the lead guitarist of the Beatles.

Sometimes called “the quiet Beatle”, Harrison embraced Indian culture and helped broaden the scope of popular music through his incorporation of Indian instrumentation and Hindu-aligned spirituality in the Beatles’ work. 

Although the majority of the band’s songs were written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, most Beatles albums from 1965 onwards contained at least two Harrison compositions.

His songs for the group include “Taxman”, “Within You Without You”, “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”, “Here Comes the Sun” and “Something”.

Harrison’s earliest musical influences included George Formby and Django Reinhardt; Carl Perkins, Chet Atkins and Chuck Berry were subsequent influences. By 1965, he had begun to lead the Beatles into folk rock through his interest in Bob Dylan and the Byrds, and towards Indian classical music through his use of the sitar on “Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)”.

Having initiated the band’s embracing of Transcendental Meditation in 1967, he subsequently developed an association with the Hare Krishna movement. After the band’s break-up in 1970, Harrison released the triple album All Things Must Pass, a critically acclaimed work that produced his most successful hit single, “My Sweet Lord”, and introduced his signature sound as a solo artist, the slide guitar.

He also organised the 1971 Concert for Bangladesh with Indian musician Ravi Shankar, a precursor to later benefit concerts such as Live Aid. In his role as a music and film producer, Harrison produced acts signed to the Beatles’ Apple record label before founding Dark Horse Records in 1974 and co-founding HandMade Films in 1978.

Harrison released several best-selling singles and albums as a solo performer. In 1988, he co-founded the platinum-selling supergroup the Traveling Wilburys. A prolific recording artist, he was featured as a guest guitarist on tracks by Badfinger, Ronnie Wood and Billy Preston, and collaborated on songs and music with Dylan, Eric Clapton, Ringo Starr and Tom Petty, among others. 

Rolling Stone magazine ranked him number 11 in their list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time”. He is a two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee – as a member of the Beatles in 1988, and posthumously for his solo career in 2004.

Harrison’s first marriage, to model Pattie Boyd in 1966, ended in divorce in 1977. The following year he married Olivia Arias, with whom he had a son, Dhani. Harrison died from lung cancer in 2001 at the age of 58, two years after surviving a knife attack by an intruder at his Friar Park home. His remains were cremated, and the ashes were scattered according to Hindu tradition in a private ceremony in the Ganges and Yamuna rivers in India. He left an estate of almost £100 million.

Chris Cornell Channeled by Karl Mollison 19Dec2021

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Chris Cornell Channeled by Karl Mollison 19Dec2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Cornell

Christopher Cornell July 20, 1964 – May 18, 2017 was an American singer, songwriter, and musician best known as the lead vocalist and rhythm guitarist for the rock bands Soundgarden and Audioslave.

He also had a solo career and contributed to soundtracks. Cornell was also the founder and frontman of Temple of the Dog, a one-off tribute band dedicated to his late friend Andrew Wood.

Cornell is considered one of the key figures of the 1990s grunge movement, and is well known for his extensive catalog as a songwriter, his nearly four-octave vocal range, and his powerful vocal belting technique.

He released four solo studio albums, Euphoria Morning (1999), Carry On (2007), Scream (2009), and Higher Truth (2015); the live album Songbook (2011); and two compilations, The Roads We Choose (2007) and Chris Cornell (2018), the latter released posthumously.

He received a Golden Globe Award nomination for his song “The Keeper”, which appeared in the 2011 film Machine Gun Preacher, and co-wrote and performed “You Know My Name”, the theme song to the 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale. His last solo release before his death was the charity single “The Promise”, written for the ending credits for the 2016 film of the same name.

Across his entire catalog, Cornell sold 14.8 million albums, 8.8 million digital songs, and 300 million on-demand audio streams in the U.S. alone, as well as over 30 million records worldwide.

He was nominated for 16 Grammy Awards, winning three.

He was voted “Rock’s Greatest Singer” by readers of Guitar World, and ranked No. 4 on the list of “Heavy Metal’s All-Time Top 100 Vocalists” by Hit Parader, No. 9 on the list of “Best Lead Singers of All Time” by Rolling Stone, and No. 12 on MTV’s “22 Greatest Voices in Music”.

Cornell struggled with depression for most of his life. He was found dead in his Detroit hotel room in the early hours of May 18, 2017, after performing at a Soundgarden concert an hour earlier at the Fox Theatre.

His death was ruled a suicide by hanging.

Once again “they” got it wrong. Cover up?

Easy to see and believe from here that this was no suicide and even easier once in the Light where everything is clear.

Carry on …

GetWisdom.com Webinar: Interloper Interference and Consequences 12Dec2021

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GetWisdom.com Webinar: Interloper Interference and Consequences 12Dec2021

About The Webinar

Interloper Interference and Consequences
​​​This month, we will present examples of a variety of types of malicious mischief and worse which have made the news. These include the wind-down of the war in Afghanistan, its cause, and the forces behind those who took over; various types of cyberwar and manipulation through technology; promotion of alien contact protocols and what can actually happen; stories of attempted escape from the alien grip; suppression of scientific progress; and political interference.

Etienne de La Boetie Channeled by Karl Mollison 05Dec2021

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Etienne de La Boetie Channeled by Karl Mollison 05Dec2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89tienne_de_La_Bo%C3%A9tie

Étienne de La Boétie 1 November 1530 – 18 August 1563 was a French magistrate, classicist, writer, poet, and political theorist, best remembered for his intense and intimate friendship with essayist Michel de Montaigne. His early political treatise Discourse on Voluntary Servitude was posthumously adopted by the Huguenot movement and is sometimes seen as an early influence on modern anti-statist, utopian, and civil disobedience thought.

La Boétie was born in Sarlat, in the Périgord region of southwest France, in 1530 to an aristocratic family. His father was a royal official of the Périgord region and his mother was the sister of the president of the Bordeaux Parliament (assembly of lawyers).

Orphaned at an early age, he was brought up by his uncle and namesake, the curate of Bouilbonnas, and received his law degree from the University of Orléans in 1553. His great and precocious ability earned La Boétie a royal appointment to the Bordeaux Parliament the following year, despite his being under the minimum age. There he pursued a distinguished career as judge and diplomatic negotiator until his untimely death from illness in 1563 at the age of thirty-two. La Boétie was also a distinguished poet and humanist, translating Xenophon and Plutarch, and being closely connected with the leading young Pleiade group of poets, including Pierre de Ronsard, Jean Daurat and Jean-Antoine de Baïf.

La Boétie was favorable to the conciliation of Catholicism and Protestantism; “warned of the dangerous and divisive consequences of permitting two religions, which could lead to two opposed states in the same country. The most he would have allowed the Protestants was the right to worship in private, and he pointed out their own intolerance of Catholics. His policy for religious peace was one of conciliation and concord through reforms in the church that would eventually persuade the Protestants to reunite with Catholicism”. He served with Montaigne in the Bordeaux parlement and is immortalized in Montaigne’s essay on friendship. Historians often speculate if the two were lovers or not, but each played influential roles in each other’s lives regardless.

La Boétie’s writings include a few sonnets, translations from the classics and an essay attacking absolute monarchy and tyranny in general, Discours de la servitude volontaire ou le Contr’un (Discourse on Voluntary Servitude, or the Anti-Dictator). The essay asserts that tyrants have power because the people give it to them. Liberty has been abandoned once by society, which afterward stayed corrupted and prefers the slavery of the courtesan to the freedom of one who refuses to dominate as he refuses to obey. Thus, La Boétie linked obedience and domination, a relationship which would be later theorised by latter anarchist thinkers. By advocating a solution of simply refusing to support the tyrant, he became one of the earliest advocates of civil disobedience and nonviolent resistance. 

Murray N. Rothbard summarizes La Boétie’s political philosophy as follows: To him, the great mystery of politics was obedience to rulers.

Why in the world do people agree to be looted and otherwise oppressed by government overlords? It is not just fear, Boetie explains in the Discourse on Voluntary Servitude, for our consent is required. And that consent can be non-violently withdrawn.

It was once thought following Montaigne’s claims that La Boétie wrote the essay in 1549 at the age of eighteen, but recent authorities argue that it is “likely that the Discourse was written in 1552 or 1553, at the age of twenty-two, while La Boétie was at the university”. 

Some Montaigne scholars have argued that the essay was in fact the work of Montaigne himself. The essay was circulated privately and not published until 1576 after La Boétie’s death. He died in Germignan near Bordeaux in 1563. His last days are described in a long letter from Montaigne to his own father.

In the 20th century, many European anarchists began to cite La Boétie as an influence, including Gustav Landauer, Bart de Ligt and Simone Weil. Autonomist Marxist thinker John Holloway also cites him in his book Crack Capitalism in order to explain his idea of “breaking with capitalism”. Gene Sharp, the leading theorist of nonviolent struggle, cites his work frequently in both The Politics of Nonviolent Action and From Dictatorship to Democracy.

Leonard Nimoy Channeled by Karl Mollison 28Nov2021

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Leonard Nimoy Channeled by Karl Mollison 28Nov2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonard_Nimoy

Leonard Simon Nimoy March 26, 1931 – February 27, 2015 was an American actor, author, director, singer, songwriter, and photographer who achieved international fame for playing Spock in the Star Trek franchise for almost 50 years; from two pilot episodes in 1965 and 1967 to his final film performance in 2013.

Originating the role of Spock on “Star Trek: The Original Series”, he went on to play him again on “Star Trek: The Animated Series”, the first six Star Trek films, and in two episodes of “Star Trek: The Next Generation”. Nimoy also directed films, including “Star Trek III: The Search for Spock” (1984) and “Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home” (1986), and appeared in several movies, television shows, and voice acted in several video games.

Nimoy began his acting career in his early twenties, teaching acting classes in Hollywood and making minor film and television appearances through the 1950s. From 1953 to 1955, Nimoy served in the United States Army as a Staff Sergeant in the Special Services, an entertainment branch of the American military. 

In February 1965, he made his first appearance as Spock in the Star Trek television pilots “The Cage” and “Where No Man Has Gone Before”, and went on to play the character until the end of the production run in early 1969, followed by eight feature films and guest appearances in later spin-offs in the franchise. From 1967 to 1970, Nimoy had a music career with Dot Records, with his first and second albums being mostly recorded in character of Spock. 

After the original Star Trek series, Nimoy starred in “Mission: Impossible” for two seasons, hosted the documentary series “In Search of…”, and made several well-received stage appearances.

Nimoy’s portrayal of Spock made a significant cultural impact and earned him three Emmy Award nominations. His public profile as Spock was so strong that both his autobiographies, I Am Not Spock and I Am Spock (1995), were written from the viewpoint of sharing his existence with the character. 

In 2015, Nimoy passed away after a long battle with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). His death became international news and was met with expressions of shock and grief by fans, Star Trek co-stars, scientists and celebrities. An asteroid was named 4864 Nimoy in his honor. The documentaries “For the Love of Spock” (2016) and “Remembering Leonard Nimoy” (2017) were produced by his son and daughter respectively; they cover his life, career, and later his illness.

Pope John XXIII Channeled by Karl Mollison 21Nov2021

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Pope John XXIII Channeled by Karl Mollison 21Nov2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope_John_XXIII

Pope John XXIII born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli, 25 November 1881 – 3 June 1963 was head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of the Vatican City State from 28 October 1958 until his death in 1963.

Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli was one of thirteen children born to a family of sharecroppers who lived in a village in Lombardy. He was ordained to the priesthood on 10 August 1904 and served in a number of posts, as nuncio in France and a delegate to Bulgaria, Greece and Turkey. In a consistory on 12 January 1953 Pope Pius XII made Roncalli a cardinal as the Cardinal-Priest of Santa Prisca in addition to naming him as the Patriarch of Venice.

Roncalli was unexpectedly elected pope on 28 October 1958 at age 76 after 11ballots. Pope John XXIII surprised those who expected him to be a caretaker pope by calling the historic Second Vatican Council (1962–1965), the first session opening on 11 October 1962.

John XXIII made many passionate speeches during his pontificate. His views on equality were summed up in his statement, “We were all made in God’s image, and thus, we are all Godly alike.” 

He made a major impact on the Catholic Church, opening it up to dramatic unexpected changes promulgated at the Vatican Council and by his own dealings with other churches and nations.

In Italian politics, he prohibited bishops from interfering with local elections, and he helped the Christian Democratic Party to cooperate with the socialists.

In international affairs, his “Ostpolitik” engaged in dialogue with the communist countries of Eastern Europe. He especially reached out to the Eastern Orthodox churches.

His overall goal was to modernize the Church by emphasizing its pastoral role, and its necessary involvement with affairs of state. He dropped the traditional rule of 70 cardinals, increasing the size to 85. He used the opportunity to name the first cardinals from Africa, Japan, and the Philippines. He promoted ecumenical movements in cooperation with other Christian faiths. In doctrinal matters, he was a traditionalist, but he ended the practice of automatically formulating social and political policies on the basis of old theological propositions.

He did not live to see the Vatican Council to completion. His cause for canonization was opened on 18 November 1965 by his successor, Pope Paul VI, who declared him a Servant of God. On 5 July 2013, Pope Francis – bypassing the traditionally required second miracle – declared John XXIII a saint, based on his virtuous, model lifestyle, and because of the good which had come from his having opened the Second Vatican Council. He was canonised alongside Pope John Paul II on 27 April 2014.

John XXIII today is affectionately known as the “Good Pope” and in Italian, “il Papa buono”.