The Pro-Science and Anti-Science Debate in Light of the Pandemic

In the most recent developments that outline the COVID-19 pandemic, the world is still without a vaccine. However, this does not mean we don’t have potential treatment options on board. One, in particular, has been doing the rounds for quite some time.

It’s called hydroxychloroquine.


What is Hydroxychloroquine?

Hydroxychloroquine is a DMARD—or a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug. It is generally used for lupus, malaria, and rheumatoid arthritis, and targets the immune system and regulates its activity. This in turn leads to a mitigation of an overactive immune system, which in some cases is the root cause of an exacerbated health condition. Hydroxychloroquine is particularly effective since it does more than simply target the symptoms of an underlying complication: it modifies the process of the disease itself.

In other words, it is more than an antimalarial drug. The drug also has antiviral activity—and it also regulates the immune system.

So, when the potent drug was revealed as a potential treatment option for coronavirus, people were naturally delighted. However, the media wasn’t equally delighted—neither were some higher-ups.

The Anti-Science Debate

Mainstream media isn’t too enthused by the prospect of a treatment in the form of hydroxychloroquine. When news broke out of its existence and efficacy, we had counter-news about a man dying from self-prescription.

Mainstream media isn’t too enthused by the prospect of a treatment in the form of

hydroxychloroquine. When news broke out of its existence and efficacy, we had counter-news about a man dying from self-prescription. The media touted the idea that the man died of the drug and not because he foolishly self-prescribed. The drug was vilified.

Initially, even the FDA warned against using the drug. Later and more recent developments, however, stand in stark contrast. The NIH has, in May, started hydroxychloroquine trials. Healthcare workers in the UK; for example, healthcare workers have started trials using hydroxychloroquine as a potential treatment option for COVID-19. Reports highlight that the politics underline the whole issue of the drug.

Perhaps the drug isn’t as useless as it was initially made out to be—and that’s the operative term here: made out to be.

The Makings of a Scandal

If there’s one thing to learn from the whole hydroxychloroquine fiasco, it’s how futile debates are stirred up among the masses. In almost no time, the masses have divided themselves into two factions: the pro-science and the anti-science blocs. What’s interesting here is that this is how greater evils, such as racism, also began: as an us versus them binary.

Karl Mollison, via channeling the Creator, has also approached this question and has explained how these dichotomies are ingrained in societies. He explains how staunchly supportive each faction is towards their own set of beliefs. Naturally, the refusal to even acknowledge an opposing belief is strong enough to stir controversy.

The pro-science and anti-science debate isn’t a naturally-occurring one. It is carefully orchestrated with the sole aim of sowing the seeds of discord in society.

Interested in More Insights about the Coronavirus?

Follow Karl Mollison’s regular updates on the Get Wisdom database. A healing practitioner with a background in the medical drug industry, he addresses questions ranging from possible treatment options to larger conspiracies that lurk around the corner.

 

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