J. Robert Oppenheimer Channeled by Karl Mollison 18Apr2021

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Robert Oppenheimer Channeled by Karl Mollison 18Apr2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Robert_Oppenheimer

Robert Oppenheimer April 22, 1904 – February 18, 1967

He was an American theoretical physicist and professor of physics at the University of California, Berkeley.

Oppenheimer was the wartime head of the Los Alamos Laboratory and is among those who are credited with being the “father of the atomic bomb” for their role in the Manhattan Project, the World War II undertaking that developed the first nuclear weapons.

The first atomic bomb was successfully detonated on July 16, 1945, in the Trinity test in New Mexico. Oppenheimer later remarked that it brought to mind words from the Bhagavad Gita: “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.” 

In August 1945, the weapons were used in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

After the war ended, Oppenheimer became chairman of the influential General Advisory Committee of the newly created United States Atomic Energy Commission. He used that position to lobby for international control of nuclear power to avert nuclear proliferation and a nuclear arms race with the Soviet Union.

He opposed the development of the hydrogen bomb during a 1949–50 governmental debate on the question and subsequently took stances on defense-related issues that provoked the ire of some factions in the U.S. government and military.

During the Second Red Scare, those stances, together with past associations Oppenheimer had with people and organizations affiliated with the Communist Party, led to him suffering the revocation of his security clearance in a much-written-about hearing in 1954. Effectively stripped of his direct political influence, he continued to lecture, write and work in physics. Nine years later, President John F. Kennedy awarded (and Lyndon B. Johnson presented) him with the Enrico Fermi Award as a gesture of political rehabilitation.

Oppenheimer’s achievements in physics included the Born–Oppenheimer approximation for molecular wave functions, work on the theory of electrons and positrons, the Oppenheimer–Phillips process in nuclear fusion, and the first prediction of quantum tunneling. With his students he also made important contributions to the modern theory of neutron stars and black holes, as well as to quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, and the interactions of cosmic rays. As a teacher and promoter of science, he is remembered as a founding father of the American school of theoretical physics that gained world prominence in the 1930s. After World War II, he became director of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey.

Oppenheimer was a chain smoker who was diagnosed with throat cancer in late 1965. After inconclusive surgery, he underwent unsuccessful radiation treatment and chemotherapy late in 1966. He fell into a coma on February 15, 1967, and died at his home in Princeton, New Jersey, on February 18, aged 62. A memorial service was held a week later at Alexander Hall on the campus of Princeton University. The service was attended by 600 of his scientific, political and military associates that included Bethe, Groves, Kennan, Lilienthal, Rabi, Smyth and Wigner.

His brother Frank and the rest of his family were also there, as was the historian Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., the novelist John O’Hara, and George Balanchine, the director of the New York City Ballet. Bethe, Kennan and Smyth gave brief eulogies. 

Oppenheimer’s body was cremated and his ashes were placed into an urn. His wife Kitty took the ashes to St. John (U.S. Virgin Islands) and dropped the urn into the sea, within sight of the beach house.

In October 1972, Kitty died at age 62 from an intestinal infection that was complicated by a pulmonary embolism.

Oppenheimer’s ranch in New Mexico was then inherited by their son Peter, and the beach property was inherited by their daughter Katherine “Toni” Oppenheimer Silber. Toni was refused security clearance for her chosen vocation as a United Nations translator after the FBI brought up the old charges against her father. In January 1977 (three months after the end of her second marriage), she committed suicide at age 32; her ex-husband found her hanging from a beam in her family beach house. She left the property to “the people of St. John for a public park and recreation area”. 

The original house was built too close to the coast and succumbed to a hurricane. Today the Virgin Islands Government maintains a Community Center in the area.


Could Oppenheimer’s work be public point of the spear for the longstanding Secret Space Program?

Robert Galbraith Heath Channeled by Karl Mollison 04Apr2021

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Robert Galbraith Heath Channeled by Karl Mollison 04Apr2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Galbraith_Heath

Robert Galbraith Heath May 9, 1915 – September 21, 1999 was an American psychiatrist.  He followed the theory of biological psychiatry that organic defects were the sole source of mental illness, and that consequently mental problems were treatable by physical means.

He published 425 papers and three books.

One of his first papers is dated 1946 Heath founded the Department of Psychiatry and Neurology at Tulane University, New Orleans, in 1949 and remained its chairman until 1980.

He performed many experiments there involving electrical stimulation of the brain via surgically implanted electrodes. He placed deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes into the brains of more than 54 patients. 

It has been suggested that this work was financed in part by the CIA and US military.  In 1972, he claimed to have converted a homosexual man to heterosexuality using DBS.

Heath also experimented with the drug bulbocapnine to induce stupor, and LSD, using prisoners in the Louisiana State Penitentiary as experimental subjects. He worked on schizophrenia patients, which he regarded as an illness with a physical basis. Heath was experimenting in 1953 on inducing paroxysms through brain stimulation. During the course of his experiments in deep brain stimulation, Heath experimented with gay conversion therapy, and claimed to have successfully converted a homosexual patient, labeled in his paper as Patient B-19.

The patient, who had been arrested for marijuana possession, was implanted with electrodes into the septal region (associated with feelings of pleasure), and many other parts of his brain. The septal electrodes were then stimulated while he was shown heterosexual pornographic material. The patient was later encouraged to have intercourse with a prostitute recruited for the study. As a result, Heath claimed the patient was successfully converted to heterosexuality. This research would be deemed unethical today for a variety of reasons. The patient was recruited for the study while under legal duress, and further implications for the patient’s well-being, including indications that electrode stimulation was addictive, were not considered.

Heath conducted a study on two rhesus macaques trained to smoke “the equivalent of one marijuana cigarette a day, five days a week for six months” and concluded that cannabis causes permanent changes in the brain. Nonetheless, he supported cannabis decriminalization. 

He later conducted a National Institutes of Health-funded study on 13 rhesus monkeys, with one rotating group representing “heavy smokers” whose cannabis dosage was believed to be comparable to three marijuana cigarettes smoked daily, a “moderate” group that was given the equivalent of one joint a day, and a third group that puffed inactive cannabis. He concluded, “Alcohol is a simple drug with a temporary effect. Marijuana is complex with a persisting effect.” 

According to the BBC, “His findings of permanent brain damage have been dismissed by similar, independently conducted studies. But other scientists have argued these methods of animal research are inconclusive.” 

According to NORML, Heath’s “work was never replicated and has since been discredited by a pair of better controlled, much larger monkey studies, one by Dr.William Slikker of the National Center for Toxicological Research and the other by Charles Rebert and Gordon Pryor of SRI International.”

Was Robert Heath aware of his role in utilizing extraterrestrial mind control under the guise of psychiatry?

General Bernard Schriever Channeled by Karl Mollison 28Mar2021

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General Bernard Schriever Channeled by Karl Mollison 28Mar2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Schriever

Bernard Adolph Schriever 14 September 1910 – 20 June 2005, also known as Bennie Schriever, was a United States Air Force general who played a major role in the Air Force’s space and ballistic programs.

Born in Bremen, Germany, Schriever immigrated to the United States as a boy and became a naturalized US citizen in 1923. He graduated from Texas A&M in 1931, and was commissioned as a reserve second lieutenant in the U.S. Army. He transferred to the United States Army Air Corps and was awarded his wings and a commission as a reservist second lieutenant in 1933. In 1937, he was released from active duty at his own request and became a pilot with Northwest Airlines, but he returned to the Air Corps with a regular commission in 1938.

During World War II, Schriever received a Master of Arts in aeronautical engineering from Stanford University in June 1942, and was sent to the Southwest Pacific Area, where he flew combat missions as a bomber pilot with the 19th Bombardment Group until it returned to the United States in 1943.

He remained in Australia as chief of the maintenance and engineering division of the Fifth Air Force Service Command until the end of the war. After the war, Schriever joined the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) headquarters at the Pentagon as chief of the Scientific Liaison Branch in the office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Materiel.

In 1954, Schriever became head of the Western Development Division (WDD), a special agency created to manage the intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) development effort. There he directed the development of the Atlas, Thor, Titan and Minuteman missiles. In 1959 he became commander of Air Research and Development Command (ARDC), and in 1961, of the Air Force Systems Command. He retired in 1966.

In retirement, Schriever became a consultant to various corporate and government clients. He served on company boards, and was a member of the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board under President Ronald Reagan. His marriage deteriorated after 1968 when he began an affair with another woman, and he and his wife separated but did not divorce, as she was a devout Roman Catholic.  In 1986, Schriever met the popular singer Joni James. He finally obtained a divorce and they married on 5 October 1997.

In honor of his service, Schriever was awarded the Delmer S. Fahrney Medal in 1982, and on 5 June 1998, Schriever Air Force Base was named for him. In 1997, he was inducted into the International Space Hall of Fame. In 2004, the Space Foundation awarded General Schriever its highest honor, the General James E. Hill Lifetime Space Achievement Award, which is presented annually to recognize outstanding individuals who have distinguished themselves through lifetime contributions to the welfare or betterment of humankind through the exploration, development and use of space, or the use of space technology.  In May 2005, General Lance W. Lord, the commander of the Air Force Space Command, presented him with the first Space Operations Badge.

Schriever died at his home in Washington, D.C., on 20 June 2005 at the age of 94 from complications of pneumonia.

General Schriever was instrumental in development of many missile systems to be used unwittingly in the extraterrestrial agenda to destroy humanity.

Thomas Merton Channeled by Karl Mollison 21March2021

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Thomas Merton Channeled by Karl Mollison 21March2021

From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Thomas-Merton

Thomas Merton, original name of Father M. Louis, January 31, 1915, Prades, France—died December 10, 1968, Bangkok, Thailand, Roman Catholic monk, poet, and prolific writer on spiritual and social themes, one of the most important American Roman Catholic writers of the 20th century.

Merton was the son of a New Zealand-born father, Owen Merton, and an American-born mother, Ruth Jenkins, who were both artists living in France. He was baptized in the Church of England but otherwise received little religious education.

The family moved to the United States during World War I, and his mother died of stomach cancer a few years later, in 1921, when Merton was six years old. He lived variously with his father and his grandparents before he was finally settled with his father in France in 1926 and then in England in 1928.

As a youth, he largely attended boarding schools in England and France. After a year at the University of Cambridge, he entered Columbia University, New York City, where he earned B.A. (1938) and M.A. (1939) degrees. Following years of agnosticism, he converted to Catholicism during his time at Columbia and began exploring the idea of entering religious life.

After teaching English at Columbia (1938–39) and at St. Bonaventure University (1939–41) near Olean, New York, he entered the Trappist Abbey of Gethsemani near Louisville, Kentucky. The Trappists are considered one of the most ascetic of the Roman Catholic monastic orders, and there Merton grew as a mystic and pursued imaginative spiritual quests through dozens of writings.

He was ordained a priest in 1949.Merton’s first published works were collections of poems—Thirty Poems (1944), A Man in the Divided Sea (1946), and Figures for an Apocalypse (1948). With the publication of the autobiographical Seven Storey Mountain (1948), he gained an international reputation.

His early works are strictly spiritual, but his writings of the early 1960s tend toward social criticism and touch on civil rights, nonviolence and pacifism, and the nuclear arms race. Many of his later works reveal a profound understanding of Eastern philosophy and mysticism unusual in a Westerner. Toward the end of his life he became deeply interested in Asian religions, particularly Buddhism, and in promoting interfaith dialogue.

During a trip to Asia in 1968, he met several times with the Dalai Lama, who praised him as having more insight into Buddhism than any other Christian he had known.

It was during this trip that Merton was fatally electrocuted by a faulty wire at an international monastic convention in Thailand.

[A book by Hugh Turley & David Martin makes a convincing case that Thomas Merton was murdered.]

Merton’s only novel, My Argument with the Gestapo, written in 1941, was published posthumously in 1969.

His other writings included The Waters of Siloe (1949), a history of the Trappists; Seeds of Contemplation (1949); and The Living Bread (1956), a meditation on the Eucharist.

Further posthumous publications included the essay collection Contemplation in a World of Action (1971); The Asian Journal of Thomas Merton (1973); seven volumes of his private journals; and several volumes of his correspondence.

Thomas Merton’s life followed a path to enlightenment and his writings invited others to contemplate their own progress.

Shi Jianqiao Channeled by Karl Mollison 07March2021

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Shi Jianqiao Channeled by Karl Mollison 07March2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shi_Jianqiao

Shi Jianqiao Chinese: 施劍翹, 1905 – 27 August 1979 was the daughter of the Chinese military officer Shi Congbin, whose killing she avenged by assassinating the former warlord Sun Chuanfang.  The revenge killing and the legal proceedings that followed were highly publicized at the time and incited public debates over the concepts of filial piety and the rule of law.

Shi Jianqiao’s given name was Shi Gulan, (simplified Chinese: 施谷兰; traditional Chinese: 施谷蘭; pinyin: Shī Gǔlán; Wade–Giles: Shih Ku-lan; lit. ’Valley Orchid’).

She adopted the name Shi Jianqiao around the time she was planning to assassinate Sun Chuanfang to avenge her father’s killing.  The characters of her adopted name mean “sword” and “to raise” alluding to her planned role as an avenging assassin.

Shi Jianqiao was born in Tongcheng City, Anhui Province, in the small village of Shazigang.

While her grandfather had still been a farmer and tofu seller, her father and one of her uncles rose to become decorated soldiers, which led to an increase in the family’s social status.

She grew up in Jinan, Shandong Province and had her feet bound as a young girl. By the year he was killed (1925), her father had been promoted to director of military affairs in Shandong Province and served as brigade commander under the local warlord Zhang Zongchang. Zhang Zongchang and hence Shi Congbin were aligned with the Fengtian clique, one of the two main competing warlord factions at the time. By some accounts, Shi Jianqiao graduated from Tianjin Normal College (Chinese: 天津師範學校; pinyin: Tiānjīn Shīfàn Xuéxiào).

In October 1925, during the second war between the Zhili and Fengtian warlord cliques, her father Shi Congbin was leading a brigade of mercenary soldiers in an attempt to capture Guzhen, Shandong.

However, he found himself surrounded by troops of the Zhili warlord Sun Chuanfang who had been leading a surprise counterattack against the advance of the Fengtian troops.

The next day, Sun had Shi decapitated and his severed head displayed in public at the train station of Bengbu, Anhui. Less than two years later, in early 1927, Sun Chuanfeng was deposed by the Northern Expedition, a military campaign by the Kuomintang that was targeted at ending the rule of the local warlords. He retired from his military career and founded the Tianjin Qingxiu lay-Buddhist society (Chinese: 天津佛教居士林; pinyin: Tiānjīn Fójiào Jūshìlín) together with his former fellow warlord Jin Yunpeng.

About 10 years after the death of her father, Shi Jianqiao tracked down Sun Chuanfang in Tianjin.

Shortly after 3pm on 13 November 1935, she approached him from behind while he was leading a sutra-recitation session at his lay-Buddhist society on Nanma Road.

She then killed the kneeling former warlord by shooting him three times with her Browning pistol. After the assassination, she stayed at the crime scene to explain her deed and distribute mimeographed pamphlets to bystanders.

Her case drew a significant amount of public and media attention. After a lengthy legal process with two appeals that ultimately reached the Supreme Court in Nanjing and pitted public sentiment against the rule of law, she was finally given a state pardon by the Nationalist government on 14 October 1936.

The assassination of Sun Chuanfang was ethically justified as an act of filial piety and turned into a political symbol of the legitimate vengeance against the Japanese invaders.

In 1949, Shi Jianqiao was elected as vice-chair of the Women’s Federation of Suzhou.  In 1957, she was appointed to the Beijing Municipal Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference.

Shi Jianqiao died in 1979, shortly after surgery for advanced colorectal cancer.  Her ashes were buried in the West Tianling Cemetery (Chinese: 西天灵公墓; pinyin: Xi Tiānlíng Gōngmù) in Suzhou City.

Jianqiao is asked about her father’s involvement with the secret space program, more accurately known as today’s Mercenary Army Program.

Viewer Questions for Creator Channeled by Karl Mollison 28Feb2021

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Viewer Questions for Creator Channeled by Karl Mollison 28Feb2021

1) What are the values inherent in geomancy, numerology and bibliomancy and can they be used beneficially and, if so, how is the best way to do that? 

2) Given the smaller land mass and smaller population when compared to some other countries, why is the United States so powerful and prominent on the world’s stage?

3) We have learned that in some cases a human soul can inhabit a human/Grey hybrid when the human component is sufficient in the make-up, but can a human clone or a human/Grey hybrid reproduce with a regular human being?

4)  How long can a human clone live and how long can a human/grey hybrid live?

5) Are there any hybrids or clones who are in the public eye such as entertainers or prominent figures in religion, politics or business?

6) How does the human clone and human/grey hybrid program harm humans and how does it serve the current negative ET annihilation plan? 

7) In what way, specifically, does the use of the Lightworker Healing Protocol solve the clone and human hybrid problem that is currently contributing to the ET annihilation plans for humankind?

8) We know that having false hopes and constant doubts can be detrimental. Could lacking faith or belief be just as detrimental? 

9) Taking into consideration one’s entire consciousness, including all conceptual, sensory and emotional phenomena and the parts of our minds which are not part of our conscious awareness – what is the best way to discern the most beneficial course of action that is in alignment with the Divine Realm and Source Creator’s plan?

10)  If a being in the light has a negative karmic backlog from previous incarnations, but chooses not to reincarnate to possibly heal that karma, how is their existence in the light affected, if at all? 

Nevil Shute Channeled by Karl Mollison 21Feb2021

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Nevil Shute Channeled by Karl Mollison 21Feb2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nevil_Shute

Nevil Shute Norway (17 January 1899 – 12 January 1960) was an English novelist and aeronautical engineer who spent his later years in Australia. He used his full name in his engineering career and Nevil Shute as his pen name to protect his engineering career from inferences by his employers (Vickers) or fellow engineers that he was not a serious person or from potential negative publicity in connection with his novels, which included “On the Beach” and “A Town Like Alice.”

Shute’s novels are written in a simple, highly readable style, with clearly delineated plot lines. Where there is a romantic element, sex is referred to only obliquely.

Many of the stories are introduced by a narrator who is not a character in the story. The most common theme in Shute’s novels is the dignity of work, spanning all classes, whether an Eastern European bar “hostess” (Ruined City) or brilliant boffin (No Highway).

His books are in three main clusters, early pre-war flying adventures; second world war; and Australia.

“On the Beach” premiered simultaneously in 18 theaters on all seven continents on December 17, 1959. The Hollywood premiere was attended by the film’s stars, Fred Astaire and Anthony Perkins, director Stanley Kramer, in addition to other celebrities, including Cary Grant. The New York premiere was attended by Mayor Robert F. Wagner Jr.. The London premiere was attended by Soviet Ambassador to the United Kingdom Yakov Malik. Star Ava Gardner attended the Rome premiere. The Tokyo premiere was attended by members of the Japanese Imperial Family. The Stockholm premiere was attended by King Gustav VI Adolf. The Melbourne premiere was attended by Premier of Victoria Henry Bolte.

Other premieres were held in West Berlin, Caracas, Chicago, Johannesburg, Lima, Paris, Toronto, Washington, D.C. and Zurich. The film was even screened in a theater at the Little America base in Antarctica.

Although the film did not receive a commercial release in the Soviet Union, a special premiere was unprecedentedly arranged for that night in Moscow. Gregory Peck and his wife traveled to Russia for the screening, which was held at a workers’ club, with 1,200 Soviet dignitaries, the foreign press corps, and diplomats including U.S. Ambassador Llewellyn Thompson attending.

What was avoided then and what is coming today?

Was Shute trying to warn of the extraterrestrial agenda to annihilate humanity with “On the Beach?”

Chen Xiaoxu Channeled by Karl Mollison 07Feb2021

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Chen Xiaoxu Channeled by Karl Mollison 07Feb2021

From https://baike.baidu.com/

Chen Xiaoxu October 29, 1965-May 13, 2007, was born in Anshan City, Liaoning Province, a film and television actress and business woman in Mainland China.

In 1982, she starred in her first TV series “Family Style”, thus formally entered the entertainment circle.

In 1984, she participated in the actor training class offered by the crew of “A Dream of Red Mansions” and obtained the qualification to play the leading actress Lin Daiyu.

In 1987, she played the heroine cousin Mei in the emotional drama “Family Spring and Autumn” in the Republic of China.

In 1989, Chen Xiaoxu formally joined the army on the recommendation of Ma Guoguang, and became an ordinary actor in the Beijing Military Region Comrade Art Troupe.

In 1990, she played Ximei in the period drama “Black Grapes.”

In 1991, she left the comrades-in-arms art troupe of the Beijing Military Region to start a business; in the same year, she joined Great Wall International Advertising Co., Ltd. and served as the production headquarters manager.

In 1996, she founded Beijing Shibang United Advertising Co., Ltd. and served as chairman. In 1998, she founded Beijing Shibang Cultural Development Co., Ltd. and served as chairman and general manager.

In 2001, she invested and filmed 4 episodes of Buddhist TV series ” The Four Trainings of the Fan.” In 2004, in the “China Advertising Billboard” appraisal, was named “China’s 30 Outstanding Female Advertisers.” In 2005, she was awarded the title of “Woman of the Year in China’s Economy” by “World Managers” Weekly. In 2006, she served as the producer of the period drama “Red Clothes Square”.

On February 23, 2007, Chen Xiaoxu held an ordination ceremony at Xinglong Temple in Hundred Kingdoms. She left his home with the name Miaozhen; on May 13 of the same year, Chen Xiaoxu died of breast cancer in Shenzhen at the age of 41.

“Chen Xiaoxu brought sister Lin from the text into the image, and from the image into the life. In her whole life, she was born for Sister Lin, existed for Sister Lin, and perishes like Sister Lin.”

Does Chen Xiaoxu see the people of China contributing to the spiritual enlightenment and salvation of humanity from her place in the light?

Truman Capote Channeled by Karl Mollison 24Jan2021

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Truman Capote Channeled by Karl Mollison 24Jan2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truman_Capote and https://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2012/12/truman-capote-answered-prayers

Truman Capote September 30, 1924 – August 25, 1984 was an American novelist, short story writer, screenwriter, playwright, and actor. Several of his short stories, novels, and plays have been praised as literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1958) and the true crime novel In Cold Blood (1966), which he labeled a “nonfiction novel”. His works have been adapted into more than 20 films and television dramas.

Capote rose above a childhood troubled by divorce, a long absence from his mother, and multiple migrations.

He had discovered his calling as a writer by age 8, and he honed his writing ability throughout his childhood.

He began his professional career writing short stories. The critical success of “Miriam” (1945) attracted the attention of Random House publisher Bennett Cerf and resulted in a contract to write the novel Other Voices, Other Rooms (1948). Capote earned the most fame with In Cold Blood (1966), a journalistic work about the murder of a Kansas farm family in their home. Capote spent six years writing the book, aided by his lifelong friend Harper Lee, who wrote To Kill a Mockingbird (1960)

In “La Côte Basque 1965,” Capote turned his diamond-brilliant, diamond-hard artistry on the haut monde of New York society fixtures: Gloria Vanderbilt, Babe Paley, Slim Keith, Lee Radziwill, Mona Williams—elegant, beautiful women he called his “swans.” They were very soignée and very rich and also his best friends.

In the story Capote revealed their gossip, the secrets, the betrayals—even a murder. “All literature is gossip,” Truman told Playboy magazine after the controversy erupted. “What in God’s green earth is Anna Karenina or War and Peace or Madame Bovary, if not gossip?”

Capote died in Bel Air, Los Angeles, on August 25, 1984, a month before his 60th birthday. According to the coroner’s report, the cause of death was “liver disease complicated by phlebitis and multiple drug intoxication”.

He died at the home of his old friend Joanne Carson, ex-wife of late-night TV host Johnny Carson, on whose program Capote had been a frequent guest. Gore Vidal responded to news of Capote’s death by calling it “a wise career move”.

Was Capote’s exposure of elite secrets his attempt to show his friends a path to enlightenment, beginning with self-reflection?

Jim Morrison Channeled by Karl Mollison 17Jan2021

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Jim Morrison Channeled by Karl Mollison 17Jan2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Morrison

Jim Morrison December 8, 1943 – July 3, 1971 was an American singer, songwriter and poet, who served as the lead vocalist of the rock band The Doors.

Due to his wild personality, poetic lyrics, his widely recognized voice, unpredictable and erratic performances, and the dramatic circumstances surrounding his life and early death, Morrison is regarded by music critics and fans as one of the most iconic and influential frontmen in rock history.

Since his death, his fame has endured as one of popular culture’s most rebellious and oft-displayed icons, representing the generation gap and youth counterculture.

Together with Ray Manzarek, Morrison co-founded the Doors during the summer of 1965 in Venice, California. The band spent two years in obscurity until shooting to prominence with their number-one single in the United States, “Light My Fire”, taken from their self-titled debut album.

Morrison wrote or co-wrote many of the Doors’ songs, including “Light My Fire”, “Break On Through (To the Other Side)”, “The End”, “Moonlight Drive”, “Wild Child”, “The Soft Parade”, “People Are Strange”, “Hello, I Love You”, “Roadhouse Blues”, “L.A. Woman”, and “Riders on the Storm”. He recorded a total of six studio albums with the Doors, all of which sold well and received critical acclaim. Morrison was well known for improvising spoken word poetry passages while the band played live. Manzarek said Morrison “embodied hippie counterculture rebellion”.

Morrison developed an alcohol dependency during the 1960s, which at times affected his performances on stage.

He died unexpectedly at the age of 27 in Paris, among conflicting witness and alleged witness reports.

As no autopsy was performed, the cause of Morrison’s death remains disputed. Though the Doors recorded two more albums after Morrison died, his death severely affected the band’s fortunes, and they split up in 1973. In 1993, Morrison was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the Doors.

In 2008, he was ranked 47th in Rolling Stone magazine’s list “The 100 Greatest Singers of All Time”. & from https://pleasekillme.com/cia-rock-roll/

Were you aware that Jim Morrison, Frank Zappa, “Papa John” Phillips, and David Crosby were all children of high-ranking members of the American military? Or that the Los Angeles neighborhood of Laurel Canyon, one-time home to all of the above, was also the location of the Air Force’s 1352nd Photographic Group? These factoids might not mean much to you, but according to the late conspiracy researcher David McGowan, they indicated a military psyop (psychological operation) of mind-blowing proportions.

McGowan, who died in 2015, laid out the theory on podcasts, through his website Center for an Informed America (CIA, get it?) and later, in his book Weird Scenes Inside The Canyon: Laurel Canyon, Covert Ops, and the Dark Heart of the Hippie Dream.

Did extraterrestrial mind control play a role in Jim Morrison’s self-destruction and early death?