Maxim Gorky Channeled by Karl Mollison 01Nov2020

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Maxim Gorky Channeled by Karl Mollison 01Nov2020

The book presentation about the American Relief Agency and Herbert Hoover https://youtu.be/PjNXilKnwu0

from https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0331003/bio

Maksim Gorky 28 March 1868 – 18 June 1936 who was born into a poor Russian family in Nizhnii Novgorod on Volga river. Gorky lost his father at an early age, he was beaten by his stepfather and became an orphan at age 9, when his mother died. He was brought up by his grandmother, who helped his development as a storyteller. He was blessed with a brilliant memory, but failed to enter a University of Kazan. At age 19 he survived a suicide attempt, because the bullet missed his heart.

After that Gorky traveled on foot for 5 years all over Central Russia, worked as a sailor on a Volga steamboat, then a salesperson, a railway worker, a salt miller, and a lawyer’s clerk. At that time, he was arrested for his public criticism of the Tsar and social injustices in Russia. He started writing for newspapers and published his first ’Sketches and Stories’ in 1890s. Later he wrote an autobiographic book “My Universities” based on impressions from his travels and jobs. Gorky wrote with sympathy about the simple folks, the outcasts, the gypsies, the hobos and dreamers in the context of social decay in the Russian Empire. He became friends with Anton Chekhov and Leo Tolstoy. His play ’The Lower Depths’ (1892) was praised by Chekhov and was successfully played in Europe and the United States. His political activism resulted in cancellation of his membership in the Russian Academy.

Anton Chekhov and Vladimir Korolenko left the Academy in protest and solidarity with Gorky. He went to live in Europe and America in 1906-13. In America he started his classic novel, ’The Mother’, about a Russian Christian woman and her imprisoned son, who both joined revolutionaries under the illusion that revolution follows Christ’s messages. After the Russian revolution in 1917, Gorky criticized Lenin and communists for their “bloody experiments on the Russian people”. He wrote, ’Lenin and Trotsky are corrupted with the dirty poison of power. They are disrespectful of human rights, freedom of speech and all other civil liberties”. Soon Gorky received a handwritten warning letter from Lenin.

Later his friend Nikolai Gumilev, ex-husband of Anna Akhmatova was executed by communists. In 1921 Gorky emigrated to Europe and settled in Capri. He became careful in his critique of communism. In 1932 after a series of brief visits, he returned to Soviet Russia.

He was placed in a rich Moscow mansion of the former railroad tycoon Ryabushinsky. His return from the fascist Italy was a victory for Soviet propaganda. He was made the Chairman of the Soviet Writer’s Union, and a figurehead of “socialist realism”.

After the murder of Kirov in 1934 Gorky was under a house arrest. His son died in 1935. The following year Gorky died suddenly at the Lenin’s dacha in Moscow.

Now he is a light being with a new perspective and a new message.

As a writer, Gorky used the pen to alert the public to corruption. Would spiritual healing methods like the Lightworker Healing Protocol have been more effective against darkness?

Harriet Tubman Channeled by Karl Mollison 04Dec2019

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Harriet Tubman Channeled by Karl Mollison 04Dec2019

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harriet_Tubman

Harriet Tubman was born Araminta Ross, c. March 1822 – March 10, 1913 was an American abolitionist and political activist. Born into slavery, Tubman escaped and subsequently made some 13 missions to rescue approximately 70 enslaved people, including family and friends, using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad.

She later helped abolitionist John Brown recruit men for his raid on Harpers Ferry. During the American Civil War, she served as an armed scout and spy for the Union Army. In her later years, Tubman was an activist in the struggle for women’s suffrage.

Born a slave in Dorchester County, Maryland, Tubman was beaten and whipped by her various masters as a child. Early in life, she suffered a traumatic head wound when an irate slave owner threw a heavy metal weight intending to hit another slave, but hitting her instead. The injury caused dizziness, pain, and spells of hypersomnia, which occurred throughout her life. After her injury, Tubman began experiencing strange visions and vivid dreams, which she ascribed to premonitions from God. These experiences, combined with her Methodist upbringing, led her to become devoutly religious.

In 1849, Tubman escaped to Philadelphia, then immediately returned to Maryland to rescue her family. Slowly, one group at a time, she brought relatives with her out of the state, and eventually guided dozens of other slaves to freedom. Traveling by night and in extreme secrecy, Tubman (or “Moses”, as she was called) “never lost a passenger”.

After the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was passed, she helped guide fugitives farther north into British North America, and helped newly freed slaves find work. Tubman met John Brown in 1858, and helped him plan and recruit supporters for his 1859 raid on Harpers Ferry.

When the Civil War began, Tubman worked for the Union Army, first as a cook and nurse, and then as an armed scout and spy. The first woman to lead an armed expedition in the war, she guided the raid at Combahee Ferry, which liberated more than 700 slaves. After the war, she retired to the family home on property she had purchased in 1859 in Auburn, New York, where she cared for her aging parents. She was active in the women’s suffrage movement until illness overtook her, and she had to be admitted to a home for elderly African Americans that she had helped to establish years earlier. After her death in 1913, she became an icon of courage and freedom.

She knew slavery then. What about slavery now?