J. Robert Oppenheimer Channeled by Karl Mollison 18Apr2021

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Robert Oppenheimer Channeled by Karl Mollison 18Apr2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Robert_Oppenheimer

Robert Oppenheimer April 22, 1904 – February 18, 1967

He was an American theoretical physicist and professor of physics at the University of California, Berkeley.

Oppenheimer was the wartime head of the Los Alamos Laboratory and is among those who are credited with being the “father of the atomic bomb” for their role in the Manhattan Project, the World War II undertaking that developed the first nuclear weapons.

The first atomic bomb was successfully detonated on July 16, 1945, in the Trinity test in New Mexico. Oppenheimer later remarked that it brought to mind words from the Bhagavad Gita: “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.” 

In August 1945, the weapons were used in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

After the war ended, Oppenheimer became chairman of the influential General Advisory Committee of the newly created United States Atomic Energy Commission. He used that position to lobby for international control of nuclear power to avert nuclear proliferation and a nuclear arms race with the Soviet Union.

He opposed the development of the hydrogen bomb during a 1949–50 governmental debate on the question and subsequently took stances on defense-related issues that provoked the ire of some factions in the U.S. government and military.

During the Second Red Scare, those stances, together with past associations Oppenheimer had with people and organizations affiliated with the Communist Party, led to him suffering the revocation of his security clearance in a much-written-about hearing in 1954. Effectively stripped of his direct political influence, he continued to lecture, write and work in physics. Nine years later, President John F. Kennedy awarded (and Lyndon B. Johnson presented) him with the Enrico Fermi Award as a gesture of political rehabilitation.

Oppenheimer’s achievements in physics included the Born–Oppenheimer approximation for molecular wave functions, work on the theory of electrons and positrons, the Oppenheimer–Phillips process in nuclear fusion, and the first prediction of quantum tunneling. With his students he also made important contributions to the modern theory of neutron stars and black holes, as well as to quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, and the interactions of cosmic rays. As a teacher and promoter of science, he is remembered as a founding father of the American school of theoretical physics that gained world prominence in the 1930s. After World War II, he became director of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey.

Oppenheimer was a chain smoker who was diagnosed with throat cancer in late 1965. After inconclusive surgery, he underwent unsuccessful radiation treatment and chemotherapy late in 1966. He fell into a coma on February 15, 1967, and died at his home in Princeton, New Jersey, on February 18, aged 62. A memorial service was held a week later at Alexander Hall on the campus of Princeton University. The service was attended by 600 of his scientific, political and military associates that included Bethe, Groves, Kennan, Lilienthal, Rabi, Smyth and Wigner.

His brother Frank and the rest of his family were also there, as was the historian Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., the novelist John O’Hara, and George Balanchine, the director of the New York City Ballet. Bethe, Kennan and Smyth gave brief eulogies. 

Oppenheimer’s body was cremated and his ashes were placed into an urn. His wife Kitty took the ashes to St. John (U.S. Virgin Islands) and dropped the urn into the sea, within sight of the beach house.

In October 1972, Kitty died at age 62 from an intestinal infection that was complicated by a pulmonary embolism.

Oppenheimer’s ranch in New Mexico was then inherited by their son Peter, and the beach property was inherited by their daughter Katherine “Toni” Oppenheimer Silber. Toni was refused security clearance for her chosen vocation as a United Nations translator after the FBI brought up the old charges against her father. In January 1977 (three months after the end of her second marriage), she committed suicide at age 32; her ex-husband found her hanging from a beam in her family beach house. She left the property to “the people of St. John for a public park and recreation area”. 

The original house was built too close to the coast and succumbed to a hurricane. Today the Virgin Islands Government maintains a Community Center in the area.


Could Oppenheimer’s work be public point of the spear for the longstanding Secret Space Program?

Truman Capote Channeled by Karl Mollison 24Jan2021

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Truman Capote Channeled by Karl Mollison 24Jan2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truman_Capote and https://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2012/12/truman-capote-answered-prayers

Truman Capote September 30, 1924 – August 25, 1984 was an American novelist, short story writer, screenwriter, playwright, and actor. Several of his short stories, novels, and plays have been praised as literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1958) and the true crime novel In Cold Blood (1966), which he labeled a “nonfiction novel”. His works have been adapted into more than 20 films and television dramas.

Capote rose above a childhood troubled by divorce, a long absence from his mother, and multiple migrations.

He had discovered his calling as a writer by age 8, and he honed his writing ability throughout his childhood.

He began his professional career writing short stories. The critical success of “Miriam” (1945) attracted the attention of Random House publisher Bennett Cerf and resulted in a contract to write the novel Other Voices, Other Rooms (1948). Capote earned the most fame with In Cold Blood (1966), a journalistic work about the murder of a Kansas farm family in their home. Capote spent six years writing the book, aided by his lifelong friend Harper Lee, who wrote To Kill a Mockingbird (1960)

In “La Côte Basque 1965,” Capote turned his diamond-brilliant, diamond-hard artistry on the haut monde of New York society fixtures: Gloria Vanderbilt, Babe Paley, Slim Keith, Lee Radziwill, Mona Williams—elegant, beautiful women he called his “swans.” They were very soignée and very rich and also his best friends.

In the story Capote revealed their gossip, the secrets, the betrayals—even a murder. “All literature is gossip,” Truman told Playboy magazine after the controversy erupted. “What in God’s green earth is Anna Karenina or War and Peace or Madame Bovary, if not gossip?”

Capote died in Bel Air, Los Angeles, on August 25, 1984, a month before his 60th birthday. According to the coroner’s report, the cause of death was “liver disease complicated by phlebitis and multiple drug intoxication”.

He died at the home of his old friend Joanne Carson, ex-wife of late-night TV host Johnny Carson, on whose program Capote had been a frequent guest. Gore Vidal responded to news of Capote’s death by calling it “a wise career move”.

Was Capote’s exposure of elite secrets his attempt to show his friends a path to enlightenment, beginning with self-reflection?

Charles Schulz Channeled by Karl Mollison 03January2021

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Charles Schulz Channeled by Karl Mollison 03January2021

From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Charles-Schulz

Charles Schulz, November 26, 1922, Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.—died February 12, 2000, Santa Rosa, California,

American cartoonist who created Peanuts, one of the most successful American comic strips of the mid-20th century.

Schulz, the son of a barber, studied cartooning in an art correspondence school after graduating in 1940 from high school.

He served in the army from 1943 to 1945 and returned first as an instructor with the art school and then as a freelance cartoonist with the St. Paul Pioneer Press and the Saturday Evening Post (1948–49).

He created the Peanuts strip (originally entitled Li’l Folks) in 1950, introducing a group of three-, four-, and five-year-old characters based upon semi-autobiographical experiences.

The main character is Charlie Brown, who represents a sort of “everyman,” a sensitive but bland and unremarkable child.

Schulz channeled the loneliness that he had experienced in his army days and the frustrations of everyday life into Charlie Brown, who is often made the butt of jokes. One of Schulz’s initial themes arose from the cruelty that exists among children.

The character of Snoopy, a beagle hound with frustrated dreams of glory, is often portrayed as being wiser than the children.

Other characters include Sally, Charlie Brown’s little sister; the tyrannical and contrary “fussbudget,” Lucy; her younger brother, Linus, who drags his security blanket wherever he goes; and Schroeder, whose obsession is playing Beethoven on a toy piano.

The Peanuts comic strip was adapted to television and to the stage, and Schulz wrote the screenplays for two feature-length animated films.

He was coauthor of Charlie Brown, Snoopy and Me (1980). The 3-D computer-animated The Peanuts Movie, based on his comic strips, was released in 2015.

In 1999 Schulz was diagnosed with colon cancer, and he announced his intention to retire in order to conserve his energies for his treatment program. Ironically, he died in his sleep the night before his final comic strip was published.

We now understand that there are often karmic causes for illness. Was this true of the cancer that claimed Charles Schulz?

Ray Charles Channeled by Karl Mollison 23Aug2020

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Ray Charles Channeled by Karl Mollison 23Aug2020

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_Charles w/edits.

Ray Charles Robinson September 23, 1930 – June 10, 2004 was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, and composer. Among friends and fellow musicians he preferred being called “Brother Ray.” He was often referred to as “The Genius.”

Charles was blinded during childhood due to glaucoma.

He witnessed the drowning of his younger brother and was separated from his mother and absentee father which caused further trauma in his younger years and perhaps throughout his life.

Charles pioneered the soul music genre during the 1950s by combining blues, jazz, rhythm and blues, and gospel styles into the music he recorded for Atlantic. He contributed to the integration of country music, rhythm and blues, and pop music during the 1960s with his crossover success on ABC Records, notably with his two Modern Sounds albums. While he was with ABC, Charles became one of the first black musicians to be granted artistic control by a mainstream record company.

Charles’ 1960 hit “Georgia On My Mind” was the first of his three career No. 1 hits on the Billboard Hot 100. His 1962 album, Modern Sounds In Country And Western Music, became his first album to top the Billboard 200. Charles had multiple singles reach the Top 40 on various Billboard charts: 44 on the US R&B singles chart, 11 on the Hot 100 singles chart, 2 on the Hot Country singles charts.

Charles cited Nat King Cole as a primary influence, but his music was also influenced by Louis Jordan and Charles Brown & the Grand Ole Opry.  He had a lifelong friendship and occasional partnership with Quincy Jones. 

Charles is a 17-time Grammy Award winner. He was honored with the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1987; 10 of his recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 2002, Rolling Stone ranked Charles No. 10 on their list of the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time,” and No. 2 on their list of the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time” in 2008.

On Halloween 1964, Charles was arrested for possession of heroin at Boston’s Logan Airport. He decided to quit heroin and entered St. Francis Hospital in Lynwood, California, where he endured four days of cold turkey withdrawal. When Charles returned to court, he received a five-year suspended sentence, four years of probation, and a fine of $10,000.

Charles responded to the saga of his drug use and reform with the songs “I Don’t Need No Doctor,” “Let’s Go Get Stoned,” and the release of Crying Time, his first album since having kicked his heroin addiction in 1966.

Charles was married twice. His first marriage was less than a year, his second 22 years. Throughout his life Charles had many relationships with women with whom he fathered a dozen children.

Charles held a family luncheon for his twelve children in 2002, ten of whom attended. He told them he was mortally ill and $500,000 had been placed in trusts for each of the children to be paid out over the next five years.

In 2003, Charles had successful hip replacement surgery and was planning to go back on tour, until he began suffering from other ailments. He died at his home in Beverly Hills, California of complications resulting from liver failure, on June 10, 2004, at the age of 73.

His final album, Genius Loves Company, released two months after his death, consists of duets with admirers and contemporaries: B. B. King, Van Morrison, Willie Nelson, James Taylor, Gladys Knight, Michael McDonald, Natalie Cole, Elton John, Bonnie Raitt, Diana Krall, Norah Jones and Johnny Mathis. The album won eight Grammy Awards.

Ray Charles as a light being now has the spiritual enlightenment needed to understand the karmic causes of his blindness, and the divine source of his talent.

Hank Williams Channeled by Karl Mollison 02Aug2020

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Hank Williams Channeled by Karl Mollison 02Aug2020

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hank_Williams

Hiram “Hank” Williams September 17, 1923 – January 1, 1953 was an American singer-songwriter and musician.

Regarded as one of the most significant and influential American singers and songwriters of the 20th century, Williams recorded 35 singles (five released posthumously) that reached the Top 10 of the Billboard Country & Western Best Sellers chart, including 11 that ranked number one (three posthumously).

Born in Mount Olive, Butler County, Alabama, Williams relocated to Georgiana with his family, where he met Rufus Payne, an African American blues musician, who gave him guitar lessons in exchange for meals or money.

Payne had a major influence on Williams’ later musical style, along with Roy Acuff and Ernest Tubb. Williams would later relocate to Montgomery, where he began his music career in 1937, when producers at radio station WSFA hired him to perform and host a 15-minute program.

He formed the Drifting Cowboys backup band, which was managed by his mother, and dropped out of school to devote his time to his career.

When several of his band members were conscripted into military service during World War II, Williams had trouble with their replacements, and WSFA terminated his contract because of his alcohol abuse.

Williams eventually married Audrey Sheppard, who was his manager for nearly a decade. After recording “Never Again” and “Honky Tonkin’” with Sterling Records, he signed a contract with MGM Records. In 1947, he released “Move It on Over”, which became a hit, and also joined the Louisiana Hayride radio program.

One year later, he released a cover of “Lovesick Blues” recorded at Herzog Studio in Cincinnati, which carried him into the mainstream of music. After an initial rejection, Williams joined the Grand Ole Opry. He was unable to read or notate music to any significant degree. Among the hits he wrote were “Your Cheatin’ Heart”, “Hey, Good Lookin’”, and “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry”.

Years of back pain, alcoholism and prescription drug abuse severely compromised his health. In 1952 he divorced Sheppard and was dismissed by the Grand Ole Opry because of his unreliability and alcohol abuse. On New Year’s Day 1953, he died suddenly while traveling to a concert in Canton, Ohio, at the age of 29. Despite his brief life, Williams is one of the most celebrated and influential popular musicians of the 20th century, especially in country music.

Many artists covered songs Williams wrote and recorded. He influenced Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis, Bob Dylan, George Jones, Charley Pride, and The Rolling Stones, among others. Williams was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame (1961), the Songwriters Hall of Fame (1970), and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (1987).

The Pulitzer Prize jury in 2010 awarded him a posthumous special citation “for his craftsmanship as a songwriter who expressed universal feelings with poignant simplicity and played a pivotal role in transforming country music into a major musical and cultural force in American life.”

Could an advanced energy treatment like the Lightworker Healing Protocol have made a difference in Hank William’s tragic life?

Gary Webb Channeled by Karl Mollison 07June2020

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Gary Webb Channeled by Karl Mollison 07June2020

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Webb

Gary Webb August 31, 1955 – December 10, 2004 was an American investigative journalist.

He began his career working for newspapers in Kentucky and Ohio, winning numerous awards, and building a strong reputation for investigative writing. Hired by the San Jose Mercury News, Webb contributed to the paper’s Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the Loma Prieta earthquake.

Webb is best known for his “Dark Alliance” series, which appeared in The Mercury News in 1996. The series examined the origins of the crack cocaine trade in Los Angeles and claimed that members of the anti-communist Contra rebels in Nicaragua had played a major role in creating the trade, using cocaine profits to support their struggle. It also suggested that the Contras may have acted with the knowledge and protection of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). The series provoked outrage, particularly in the Los Angeles African-American community, and led to four major investigations of its charges.

The Los Angeles Times and other major papers published articles suggesting the “Dark Alliance” claims were overstated. After an internal review, The Mercury News ultimately published a statement in May 1997 acknowledging shortcomings in the series’ reporting and editing.

The “Dark Alliance” series remains controversial. Critics view the series’ claims as inaccurate or overstated, while supporters point to the results of a later CIA investigation as vindicating the series. Criticism has also been directed at the follow up reporting in the Los Angeles Times and other papers for focusing on problems in the series rather than re-examining the earlier CIA-Contra claims.

Webb resigned from The Mercury News in December 1997. He became an investigator for the California State Legislature, published a book based on the “Dark Alliance” series in 1998, and did freelance investigative reporting. He committed suicide on December 10, 2004.

Is there really such a thing as engineered suicide?

https://ajrarchive.org/Article.asp?id=3874&id=3874

Movie Trailer https://youtu.be/VW4XO-52ubE

Could the secret space program be responsible for dark doings Gary uncovered?  

Michael Landon Channeled by Karl Mollison 01Jan2020

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Michael Landon Channeled by Karl Mollison 01Jan2020

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Landon

Michael Landon was born Eugene Maurice Orowitz; October 31, 1936 – July 1, 1991) was an American actor, writer, director, and producer. He is known for his roles as Little Joe Cartwright in Bonanza (1959–1973), Charles Ingalls in Little House on the Prairie (1974–1983), and Jonathan Smith in Highway to Heaven (1984–1989). Landon appeared on the cover of TV Guide 22 times, second only to Lucille Ball.

Michael was married 3 times and had nine children, some adopted and he seemed a very devoted father to his children whose birth dates ranged from 1948 to 1986. He was also able to parlay his TV popularity into using his own ideas for TV series namely Little House on the Prairie and Highway to Heaven.

On April 2, 1991, Landon began to suffer from a severe headache while he was on a skiing vacation in Utah. On April 5, 1991, he learned that he had been diagnosed with a particularly aggressive form of pancreatic cancer. 

The cancer was inoperable and terminal. On May 9, 1991, he appeared on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson to speak about the cancer and condemn the tabloid press for its sensational headlines and inaccurate stories, including the claim that he and his wife were trying to have another child. During his appearance, Landon pledged to fight the disease and asked his fans to pray for him. 

In June 1991, he appeared on the cover of Life Magazine after granting the periodical an exclusive private interview about his life, his family, and his struggle to live.

On July 1, 1991, at age 54, Landon died in Malibu, California.

George Washington Channeled by Karl Mollison 10Oct2017

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George Washington Channeled by Karl Mollison 10Oct2017

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Washington

George Washington February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799 was an American political leader, military general, statesman, and Founding Father who served as the first president of the United States from 1789 to 1797. Previously, he led Patriot forces to victory in the nation’s War for Independence. He presided at the Constitutional Convention of 1787 which established the U.S. Constitution and a federal government. Washington has been called the “Father of His Country” for his manifold leadership in the formative days of the new nation.

Washington received his initial military training and command with the Virginia Regiment during the French and Indian War. He was later elected to the Virginia House of Burgesses and was named a delegate to the Continental Congress, where he was appointed Commanding General of the Continental Army. He commanded American forces, allied with France, in the defeat and surrender of the British during the Siege of Yorktown, and resigned his commission in 1783 after the signing of the Treaty of Paris.

Washington played a key role in the adoption and ratification of the Constitution and was then elected president by the Electoral College in the first two elections. He implemented a strong, well-financed national government while remaining impartial in a fierce rivalry between cabinet members Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton. During the French Revolution, he proclaimed a policy of neutrality while sanctioning the Jay Treaty. He set enduring precedents for the office of president, including the title “President of the United States”, and his Farewell Address is widely regarded as a pre-eminent statement on republicanism.

Washington owned slaves for labor and trading, and supported measures passed by Congress protecting slavery, in order to preserve national unity. He later became troubled with the institution of slavery and freed his slaves in a 1799 will. He endeavored to assimilate Native Americans into Western culture, but responded to their hostility in times of war. He was a member of the Anglican Church and the Freemasons, and he urged broad religious freedom in his roles as general and president. Upon his death, he was eulogized as “first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen.” He has been memorialized by monuments, art, geographical locations, stamps, and currency, and many scholars and polls rank him among the greatest American presidents.

Now he is a Light Being. What does he say?