Louis Jolyon West Channeled by Karl Mollison 15May2022

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Louis Jolyon West Channeled by Karl Mollison 15May2022

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Jolyon_West

Louis Jolyon West October 6, 1924 – January 2, 1999 was an American psychiatrist involved in the public sphere. In 1954, at the age of 29 and with no previous tenure-track appointment, he became a full professor and chair of psychiatry at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine.

From 1969 to 1989, he served as chair of psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine and the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute.

West’s work on brainwashing techniques allowed him to exonerate U.S. servicemen under suspicion of treason for making false confessions during the Korean War-era. This brought him to the attention of the CIA, with which his relationship, at present controversial, requires further study.

He pioneered research into the use and abuse of LSD.

According to West, Scientologists attempted to discredit him and get him fired, using methods similar to those used in Operation Freakout. This was allegedly done after his contributions to a 1980 textbook that classified Scientology as a cult.

West participated in an American Psychiatric Association panel on cults. Each speaker had received a letter threatening a lawsuit if Scientology were mentioned; apparently others were intimidated. Only West, the last speaker, referred to the letter and the cult: “I read parts of the letter to the 1,000-plus psychiatrists and then told any Scientologists in the crowd to pay attention. I said I would like to advise my colleagues that I consider Scientology a cult and L. Ron Hubbard a quack and a fake. I wasn’t about to let them intimidate me.”

West was also active in studying the creation and management of cults, and anti-death penalty activism. Along with friend Charlton Heston, he supported the Civil Rights Movement, frequently participating in sit-ins and rallies.

In 1999, West died at his home in Los Angeles at age 74. His family said the cause of death was metastatic cancer. However, West’s son John would later assert in a 2009 memoir that he helped his father end his life at the latter’s choice by using prescription medication due to the terminal illness.

And from http://www.whale.to/b/west_q.html

Alleged persons he treated: Charles Manson, Sirhan-Sirhan, and later David Koresh. January 7, 1999, Reuters: “After examining [Jack] Ruby, the killer of President John F. Kennedy’s assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, West concluded Ruby was suffering from ’major mental illness precipitated by the stress of (his) trial.’’’ Member of the White House Conference on Civil Rights in 1966. For many years he fought for the abolishment of the death penalty. Member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the FMS Foundation (as reported in the FMS Foundation Newsletter, Vol 4, No. 8, September 1, 1995). Dr. Colin Ross, who received many FOIA documents pertaining to U.S. government mind control research: “Started off as a Top Secret official for the Air Force who interviewed the American pilots who came back from Korea having been captured and brainwashed by the Communist Chinese. Joly West and Margaret Singer worked for Air Force Intelligence talking to those downed American pilots who were actually DDNOS level Manchurian Candidates. Director the Cult Awareness Network… funded under MKULTRA to study the psychobiology of dissociation. He will probably go down in history as the only person to kill an elephant at Oklahoma City Zoo with LSD…

Joly West was the expert witness in the trial for Patty Hearst. Who were the expert witnesses called to explain to the jury that Patty Hearst was actually a victim of coercive persuasion, mind control and brainwashing … Joly West, Margaret Singer, Robert Lifton and Martin Orne. So what did Joly West have to do with Vacaville? Joly West was Head of the UCLA Violence Project which was approved by Ronald Reagan when he was Governor of California, then shut down by public protest. It was spearheaded by a number of people including some people who were very interested in the history of CIA military mind control, and have written books about it. Well the UCLA Violence Project you are going to see in subsequent slides… [Joly was a] CIA and military contractor, and an expert on multiple personality and other things… he actually mentions multiple personality in his CIA proposal. He tried to set up this UCLA violence center that was going to be funded by Ronald Reagan and Frank Irvine from the Harvard brain electrode implant team was going to come. One of the things that was going to be done at the UCLA violence project and also at Vacaville State Prison under a separate administrative structure, but which got shut down by public protest, was that they were going to implant brain electrodes in violent sex offenders…”

Donald Rumsfeld Channeled by Karl Mollison 24Apr2022

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Donald Rumsfeld Channeled by Karl Mollison 24Apr2022

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Rumsfeld’

Donald Henry Rumsfeld July 9, 1932 – June 29, 2021 was an American politician, government official and businessman who served as Secretary of Defense from 1975 to 1977 under president Gerald Ford, and again from 2001 to 2006 under President George W. Bush.

He was both the youngest and the oldest secretary of defense. Additionally, Rumsfeld was a three-term U.S. Congressman from Illinois (1963–1969), director of the Office of Economic Opportunity (1969–1970), Counselor to the President (1969–1973), the U.S. Representative to NATO (1973–1974), and the White House Chief of Staff (1974–1975). Between his terms as secretary of defense, he served as the CEO and chairman of several companies.

Born in Illinois, Rumsfeld attended Princeton University, graduating in 1954 with a degree in political science. After serving in the Navy for three years, he mounted a campaign for Congress in Illinois’s 13th Congressional District, winning in 1962 at the age of 30. While in Congress, he was a leading co-sponsor of the Freedom of Information Act. Rumsfeld accepted an appointment by President Richard Nixon to head the Office of Economic Opportunity in 1969; appointed counsellor by Nixon and entitled to Cabinet-level status, he also headed up the Economic Stabilization Program before being appointed ambassador to NATO. Called back to Washington in August 1974, Rumsfeld was appointed chief of staff by President Ford.

Rumsfeld recruited a young one-time staffer of his, Dick Cheney, to succeed him when Ford nominated him to be Secretary of Defense in 1975. When Ford lost the 1976 election, Rumsfeld returned to private business and financial life, and was named president and CEO of the pharmaceutical corporation G. D. Searle & Company. He was later named CEO of General Instrument from 1990 to 1993 and chairman of Gilead Sciences from 1997 to 2001.

Rumsfeld was appointed Secretary of Defense for a second time in January 2001 by President George W. Bush. As Secretary of Defense, Rumsfeld played a central role in the invasion of Afghanistan and invasion of Iraq. Before and during the Iraq War, he claimed that Iraq had an active weapons of mass destruction program; yet no stockpiles were ever found. A Pentagon Inspector General report found that Rumsfeld’s top policy aide “developed, produced, and then disseminated alternative intelligence assessments on the Iraq and al-Qaeda relationship, which included some conclusions that were inconsistent with the consensus of the Intelligence Community, to senior decision-makers “Eight U.S. and other NATO-member retired generals and admirals called for Rumsfeld to resign in early 2006 in what was called the “Generals Revolt”, accusing him of “abysmal” military planning and lack of strategic competence.

Commentator Pat Buchanan reported at the time that Washington Post columnist David Ignatius, who traveled often to Iraq and supported the war, said the generals “mirror the views of 75 percent of the officers in the field, and probably more”. Rumsfeld rebuffed these criticisms, stating, “out of thousands and thousands of admirals and generals, if every time two or three people disagreed we changed the secretary of defense of the United States, it would be like a merry-go-round.”

Bush defended Rumsfeld throughout and responded by stating that Rumsfeld is “exactly what is needed”.

Rumsfeld shakes President Bush’s hand as he announces his resignation, November 8, 2006.

On November 1, 2006, Bush stated he would stand by Rumsfeld as defense secretary for the length of his term as president. Rumsfeld wrote a resignation letter dated November 6, 2006, and, per the stamp on the letter, Bush saw it on Election Day, November 7, 2006. Rumsfeld’s tenure was controversial for its use of torture and the Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse scandal.

In his retirement years, he published an autobiography, Known and Unknown, as well as Rumsfeld’s Rules: Leadership Lessons in Business, Politics, War, and Life.

He died on June 29, 2021, at the age of 88.

Philip Seymour Hoffman Channeled by Karl Mollison 06Mar2022

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Philip Seymour Hoffman Channeled by Karl Mollison 06Mar2022

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Seymour_Hoffman

Philip Seymour Hoffman July 23, 1967 – February 2, 2014 was an American actor, director, and producer. Best known for his distinctive supporting and character roles—typically lowlifes, eccentrics, bullies, and misfits—he acted in many films, including leading roles, from the early 1990s until his death in 2014.

Born and raised in Fairport, New York, Hoffman was drawn to theater in his youth after attending a stage production of Arthur Miller’s All My Sons at age 12. Hoffman studied acting at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, began his screen career in a 1991 episode of Law & Order, and started to appear in films in 1992. He gained recognition for his supporting work, notably in Scent of a Woman (1992), Twister (1996), Boogie Nights (1997), Happiness (1998), Patch Adams (1998), The Big Lebowski (1998), Magnolia (1999), The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999), Almost Famous (2000), Punch-Drunk Love (2002), and Along Came Polly (2004). He began to occasionally play leading roles, and for his portrayal of the author Truman Capote in Capote (2005) won multiple accolades, including the Academy Award for Best Actor. Hoffman’s profile continued to grow and he received three nominations for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performances as a brutally frank CIA officer in Charlie Wilson’s War (2007), a Catholic priest accused of pedophilia in Doubt (2008), and the charismatic leader of a Scientology-type movement in The Master (2012).

While he mainly worked in independent films, including The Savages (2007) and Synecdoche, New York (2008), Hoffman also appeared in Flawless (1999), and Hollywood blockbusters such as Twister (1996), Mission: Impossible III (2006), and in one of his final roles, as Plutarch Heavensbee in the Hunger Games series (2013–15). The feature Jack Goes Boating (2010) marked his debut as a filmmaker. Hoffman was also an accomplished theater actor and director. He joined the off -Broadway LAByrinth Theater Company in 1995, where he directed, produced, and appeared in numerous stage productions. His performances in three Broadway plays—True West in 2000, Long Day’s Journey into Night in 2003, and Death of a Salesman in 2012—all led to Tony Award nominations.

Hoffman struggled with drug addiction as a young adult and relapsed in 2012 after many years of abstinence. In February 2014, he died of combined drug intoxication. Remembered for his fearlessness in playing reprehensible characters, and for bringing depth and humanity to such roles, Hoffman was described in his New York Times obituary as “perhaps the most ambitious and widely admired American actor of his generation”.

Chris Cornell Channeled by Karl Mollison 19Dec2021

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Chris Cornell Channeled by Karl Mollison 19Dec2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Cornell

Christopher Cornell July 20, 1964 – May 18, 2017 was an American singer, songwriter, and musician best known as the lead vocalist and rhythm guitarist for the rock bands Soundgarden and Audioslave.

He also had a solo career and contributed to soundtracks. Cornell was also the founder and frontman of Temple of the Dog, a one-off tribute band dedicated to his late friend Andrew Wood.

Cornell is considered one of the key figures of the 1990s grunge movement, and is well known for his extensive catalog as a songwriter, his nearly four-octave vocal range, and his powerful vocal belting technique.

He released four solo studio albums, Euphoria Morning (1999), Carry On (2007), Scream (2009), and Higher Truth (2015); the live album Songbook (2011); and two compilations, The Roads We Choose (2007) and Chris Cornell (2018), the latter released posthumously.

He received a Golden Globe Award nomination for his song “The Keeper”, which appeared in the 2011 film Machine Gun Preacher, and co-wrote and performed “You Know My Name”, the theme song to the 2006 James Bond film Casino Royale. His last solo release before his death was the charity single “The Promise”, written for the ending credits for the 2016 film of the same name.

Across his entire catalog, Cornell sold 14.8 million albums, 8.8 million digital songs, and 300 million on-demand audio streams in the U.S. alone, as well as over 30 million records worldwide.

He was nominated for 16 Grammy Awards, winning three.

He was voted “Rock’s Greatest Singer” by readers of Guitar World, and ranked No. 4 on the list of “Heavy Metal’s All-Time Top 100 Vocalists” by Hit Parader, No. 9 on the list of “Best Lead Singers of All Time” by Rolling Stone, and No. 12 on MTV’s “22 Greatest Voices in Music”.

Cornell struggled with depression for most of his life. He was found dead in his Detroit hotel room in the early hours of May 18, 2017, after performing at a Soundgarden concert an hour earlier at the Fox Theatre.

His death was ruled a suicide by hanging.

Once again “they” got it wrong. Cover up?

Easy to see and believe from here that this was no suicide and even easier once in the Light where everything is clear.

Carry on …

Lysander Spooner Channeled by Karl Mollison 07Nov2021

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Lysander Spooner Channeled by Karl Mollison 07Nov2021

From https://ammo.com/articles/lysander-spooner-first-private-post-office-anarchism-forgotten-history     by Sam Jacobs

Lysander Spooner January 19, 1808 – May 14, 1887 is an important – and not exactly obscure – figure in the history of the liberty movement. He’s an idiosyncratic figure from the 19th century with no small cheerleading section in the 21st century. A bit of a throwback to a very different time, Spooner was a champion of the labor movement and was even a member of the First International at a time when socialists and anarchists coexisted peacefully within that movement.

Perhaps one of the most interesting things about Spooner is that he ran a private company in direct competition with the United States Post Office. This endeavor predictably failed not because the American Letter Mail Company couldn’t compete, but because Spooner was hamstrung by lawfare.

Spooner was born in Athol, MA, in 1808, a descendant of Mayflower pilgrims and the second of nine children. His career as a lawyer set the template for the rest of his life’s work: Spooner had studied under a number of prominent lawyers (a practice known as “reading law,” which was much more common at the time). However, he did not have a degree and state law required that he study further under a lawyer. He considered this legal discrimination and went ahead and started practicing law anyway.

In 1836, the state legislature got rid of the requirement. Indeed, Spooner was against any legal requirement for licensure of any profession, something that would come up again later on in his battle against the United States Post Office. This was part of Spooner’s belief in a natural law, whereby any act of coercion was ipso facto illegal.

Spooner’s law practice was not a success, nor were his attempts to dabble in the real estate market. He moved back onto his father’s farm in 1840. It was here that he hatched the plan for the American Letter Mail Company.

Throughout the 1840s, the rates of the Post Office were a source of national controversy, with many Americans considering them exorbitantly high. For context, in those days it cost 25 cents to send a letter from Boston to Washington, D.C. That’s about $7.50 in 2020 dollars. Freight, however, was significantly cheaper: a barrel of flour cost about 2/3 what it cost to send that very same letter.

Spooner astutely noticed that while the Constitution provides for a state-run Post Office, it does not prohibit private citizens from running their own independent post office. With Spooner’s independent solution on the market, prices began to drop significantly. Court cases were generally found in Spooner’s favor, with the U.S. Circuit Court agreeing with his argument that the United States government had no right to monopolize the mail system.

Congress took action, passing a law in 1851, that made the United States Post Office a legal monopoly.

This spelled the end of Spooner’s company, but he was known thereafter as “the father of the 3-cent stamp.”

Where Spooner primarily came to public attention was as an abolitionist. In 1845, he published a book called The Unconstitutionality of Slavery, in which he argued that the United States Constitution prohibited slavery. Part of his argument was predicated upon his belief that all unjust laws were unconstitutional and could be struck down by judges. His arguments were cited in the party platform of the Liberty Party and were cited by Fredrick Douglass as changing his mind on the subject.

From the publication of this book up to 1861, Spooner was a tireless campaigner against slavery. He drafted works on jury nullification and other ways for private citizens to fight it. He frequently provided legal counsel for runaway slaves gratis. Pro-slavery Mississippi Senator Albert G. Brown believed that Spooner provided the strongest legal challenge to slavery, of which he was aware.

Spooner also advocated for guerilla warfare and other forms of violence to stop slavery in the United States. However, he also opposed the United States using force to keep the Confederate States in the Union. His view was that the same natural law making it right and just for slaves to revolt against their owners, made it wrong and unjust for the United States to use military force against the South. This made him somewhat unpopular on both sides of the war, as his arguments were at variance with each side’s official narrative.

After the war, he continued to write on the subject of jury nullification. Most of his later work appeared in individualist anarchist Benjamin Tucker’s journal Liberty.

Spooner was an anarchist of a tradition that has largely disappeared from the scene: The individualist anarchist who prizes pre-industrial society and small stakeholders as a counterweight to industrial capitalism, of which Spooner was a sharp critic. He was also opposed to laws against usury, as well as laws preventing the minting of private currency.

He championed self-employment and opposed wage labor.

As the libertarian movement began to emerge in the early 20th century, Spooner’s work enjoyed something of a renaissance, being reprinted in the popular journals of the day such as Rampart Journal and Left and Right: A Journal of Libertarian Thought. Murray Rothbard has cited him as an influence, as has Randy Barnett. However, his critique of wage labor and capitalism makes it difficult to place Spooner as an “anarcho-capitalist” in the way that it would be thought of today.

Spooner was a champion of the small businessman, the small farmer, and the workers’ cooperative. Perhaps the mark that Spooner leaves most on the libertarian movement as we know it today is his critique of the Constitution, which he believed does not carry any inherent authority. As such, individuals are not legally or morally obligated to comply with federal authority. Such sentiments are often echoed by sovereign citizens, tax resistors, and other members of the liberty movement.

Spooner is worth a read, not just because his ideas are still relevant today (which they are) but also because he exists in such an unusual and untread space in the history of American liberty. You might not agree with everything that he has to say, but you’ll certainly have a hard time arguing against it.

Percy Crosby Channeled by Karl Mollison 12Sept2021

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Percy Crosby Channeled by Karl Mollison 12Sept2021

From http://www.skippy.com/skippy1.html

Percy Crosby December 8, 1891 – December 8, 1964

During his career as a celebrity American artist and author, Percy Crosby crusaded against corruption and stood up to the likes of Al Capone and his henchmen when American citizens were too frightened to speak out.

He used his Irish humor and gift of satire to lampoon politicians, President Roosevelt, the Ku Klux Klan, and fought for civil liberties, child labor laws, rights of veterans, and freedom of the press.

Although he made a profound impression with millions of Americans, primarily through Skippy, the loveable and mischievous cartoon character who became a household word, Percy Crosby was unable to prevent retaliation by those who coveted control of Skippy for their commercial gain, and wanted him silenced.

Percy Crosby was falsely imprisoned in a New York mental hospital for the last 16 years of his life, following years of harassment by the IRS. He referred to this period of his life as a “political witch hunt.”

During this time, Crosby’s famous Skippy trademark and its valuable goodwill was pirated by a bankrupt peanut butter company, which later merged with a Fortune 500 company, making a fortune in illicit sales under the Skippy brand name.

The true story concealed from Crosby’s heirs, aided and abetted by Percy Crosby’s lawyers, has shocked thousands of Skippy fans, collectors, consumers, artists, writers and lawyers.

Thanks to the advent of the Internet, the lawful Skippy heirs can reveal what the food pirates (Bestfoods) and their army of attorneys concealed from the courts and the public for decades, threatening to use their “political influence in Washington to keep certain doors forever shut” to Skippy’s business. Bestfoods’ legal department, apprehensive of being exposed on the Internet as the naked Emperor, has recently changed its website about its Skippy history, and compounded its conduct by engaging in willful wire fraud, a federal crime.

The familiar saying applies here: “The only way evil can prevail is for men of good will to say and do nothing.”

Murray Rothbard Channeled by Karl Mollison 29Aug2021

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Murray Rothbard Channeled by Karl Mollison 29Aug2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murray_Rothbard

Murray Newton Rothbard March 2, 1926 – January 7, 1995 was an American heterodox economist of the Austrian School, economic historian and political theorist.

Rothbard was a founder and leading theoretician of anarcho-capitalism, a staunch advocate of historical revisionism and a central figure in the 20th-century American libertarian movement.

He wrote over twenty books on political theory, revisionist history, economics, and other subjects.

Rothbard argued that all services provided by the “monopoly system of the corporate state” could be provided more efficiently by the private sector and wrote that the state is “the organization of robbery systematized and writ large”.

He called fractional-reserve banking a form of fraud and opposed central banking. 

He categorically opposed all military, political, and economic interventionism in the affairs of other nations. 

According to his protégé Hans-Hermann Hoppe, “[t]here would be no anarcho-capitalist movement to speak of without Rothbard”.

Libertarian economist Jeffrey Herbener, who calls Rothbard his friend and “intellectual mentor”, wrote that Rothbard received “only ostracism” from mainstream academia. 

In 1953, Rothbard married JoAnn Beatrice Schumacher whom he called Joey, in New York City. JoAnn was a historian and was Rothbard’s personal editor and a close adviser as well as hostess of his Rothbard Salon. They enjoyed a loving marriage and Rothbard often called her “the indispensable framework” of his life and achievements.

Rothbard rejected mainstream economic methodologies and instead embraced the praxeology of his most important intellectual precursor, Ludwig von Mises.

A list of some of his books:

  • Man, Economy, and State
  • The Panic of 1819: Reactions and Policies
  • America’s Great Depression
  • Power and Market: Government and the Economy
  • For a New Liberty: The Libertarian Manifesto
  • The Essential von Mises
  • Egalitarianism as a Revolt Against Nature and Other Essays
  • Conceived in Liberty
  • The Logic of Action
  • The Ethics of Liberty
  • The Mystery of Banking
  • The Case Against the Fed
  • America’s Great Depression
  • An Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought
  • Making Economic Sense
  • The Betrayal of the American Right

To promote his economic and political ideas, Rothbard joined Lew Rockwell and Burton Blumert in 1982 to establish the Mises Institute in Alabama.

Rothbard died of a heart attack on January 7, 1995, at the age of 68. He was buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Unionville, Virginia.

Anthony Bourdain Channeled by Karl Mollison 15Aug2021

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Anthony Bourdain Channeled by Karl Mollison 15Aug2021

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony_Bourdain

Anthony Michael Bourdain June 25, 1956 – June 8, 2018 was an American celebrity chef, author, and travel documentarian, who starred in programs focusing on the exploration of international culture, cuisine, and the human condition. 

Bourdain was a 1978 graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and a veteran of a number of professional kitchens during his career, which included many years spent as an executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles in Manhattan.

He first became known for his bestselling book Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000). His first food and world-travel television show A Cook’s Tour ran for 35 episodes on the Food Network in 2002 and 2003. In 2005, he began hosting the Travel Channel’s culinary and cultural adventure programs Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005–2012) and The Layover (2011–2013).

In 2013, he began a three-season run as a judge on The Taste, and concurrently switched his travelogue programming to CNN to host Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown.

Though best known for his culinary writings and television presentations, along with several books on food and cooking and travel adventures, Bourdain also wrote both fiction and historical nonfiction.

In early June 2018, Bourdain was working on an episode of Parts Unknown in Strasbourg, with his frequent collaborator and friend Éric Ripert. 

On June 8, Ripert became worried when Bourdain had missed dinner and breakfast. He subsequently found Bourdain dead of an apparent suicide by hanging in his room at Le Chambard hotel in Kaysersberg near Colmar.

Christian de Rocquigny du Fayel, the public prosecutor for Colmar, said Bourdain’s body bore no signs of violence and the suicide appeared to be an impulsive act. 

Rocquigny du Fayel disclosed that Bourdain’s toxicology results were negative for narcotics, showing only a trace of a therapeutic non-narcotic medication. 

Bourdain’s body was cremated in France on June 13, 2018, and his ashes were returned to the United States two days later.

We seemingly break new ground with the testimony from the Light Being who was Anthony Bourdain when he answers a question about the circumstances regarding his death.

Hunter S. Thompson Channeled by Karl Mollison 20June2021

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Hunter S. Thompson Channeled by Karl Mollison 20 June 2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hunter_S._Thompson

Hunter S. Thompson July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005 was an American journalist and author, and the founder of the gonzo journalism movement. He first rose to prominence with the publication of Hell’s Angels (1967), a book for which he spent a year living and riding with the Hells Angels motorcycle club to write a first-hand account of the lives and experiences of its members.

In 1970, he wrote an unconventional magazine feature titled “The Kentucky Derby Is Decadent and Depraved” for Scanlan’s Monthly, which both raised his profile and established him as a writer with counterculture credibility. It also set him on a path to establishing his own subgenre of New Journalism that he called “Gonzo”, which was essentially an ongoing experiment in which the writer becomes a central figure and even a participant in the events of the narrative.

Thompson remains best known for Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1971), a book first serialized in Rolling Stone in which he grapples with the implications of what he considered the failure of the 1960s counterculture movement. It was adapted on film twice: loosely in Where the Buffalo Roam starring Bill Murray as Thompson in 1980, and directly in 1998 by director Terry Gilliam in a film starring Johnny Depp and Benicio del Toro. The Doonesbury cartoon character Uncle Duke – who was modeled after Thompson – pens an essay about “my shoplifting conviction” titled “Fear and Loathing at Macy’s Menswear”, a reference to Thompson’s book.

Politically minded, Thompson ran unsuccessfully for sheriff of Pitkin County, Colorado, in 1970 on the Freak Power ticket. His run for sheriff is chronicled in the documentary film Freak Power: The Ballot or the Bomb. He became well known for his dislike of Richard Nixon, who he claimed represented “that dark, venal, and incurably violent side of the American character”. He covered Nixon’s 1972 re-election campaign for Rolling Stone and later collected the stories in book form as Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail ’72.

Thompson’s output notably declined from the mid-1970s, as he struggled with the consequences of fame, and he complained that he could no longer merely report on events, as he was too easily recognized. He was also known for his lifelong use of alcohol and illegal narcotics, his love of firearms, and his iconoclastic contempt for authoritarianism. He often remarked: “I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they’ve always worked for me.”

Thompson died by suicide at the age of 67, following a series of health problems. In accordance with his wishes, his ashes were fired out of a cannon in a ceremony funded by his friend Johnny Depp and attended by friends including then-Senator John Kerry and Jack Nicholson. Hari Kunzru wrote, “the true voice of Thompson is revealed to be that of American moralist … one who often makes himself ugly to expose the ugliness he sees around him.”

Kary Mullis Channeled by Karl Mollison 23May2021

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Kary Mullis Channeled by Karl Mollison 23May2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kary_Mullis and https://mynewsla.com/education/2019/08/08/nobel-winner-kary-banks-mullis-who-revolutionized-dna-research-dies-in-o-c/

Kary Mullis December 28, 1944 – August 7, 2019 was an American biochemist. In recognition of his invention of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, he shared the 1993 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Michael Smith and was awarded the Japan Prize in the same year. His invention became a central technique in biochemistry and molecular biology, described by The New York Times as “highly original and significant, virtually dividing biology into the two epochs of before PCR and after PCR.”

Mullis was working as a chemist for Cetus Corp. in Emeryville in 1983 when he developed the polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, which allows for amplification and replication of specific strands of DNA. The process revolutionized the fields of biochemistry and molecular biology.

When accepting the Nobel Prize, Mullis said he came up with the breakthrough while driving from Berkeley to Mendocino, where he had a cabin. While traveling along a dark road, he “solved the most annoying problems in DNA chemistry in a single lightning bolt,” Mullis said.

The discovery of PCR has been credited with transforming genetic and forensic research and diagnostic medicine.

Born in North Carolina, Mullis earned a chemistry degree at Georgia Tech in 1966 and a doctorate in biochemistry from UC Berkeley in 1972. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Kansas Medical School then spent two years doing postdoctoral work in pharmaceutical chemistry at UC San Francisco before joining Cetus Corp. as a DNA chemist in 1979.

After devising PCR, Mullis founded and served as an adviser for numerous biotech firms, and served as a consultant in nucleic acid chemistry for more than a dozen corporations. He lectured at colleges and corporations around the world and earned patents for various inventions, including a process for amplifying nucleic acids and a system for visualizing exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

He was inducted into the Inventors Hall of Fame in 1998.

He authored numerous scientific publications, along with a 1998 autobiographical work, “Dancing Naked in the Mind Field.”


What role in constraining science can the light being Kary Mullis attribute to extraterrestrial mind control?