Pliny the Younger Channeled by Karl Mollison 02Jan2022

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Pliny the Younger Channeled by Karl Mollison 02Jan2022

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pliny_the_Younger

Pliny the Younger 61 – c. 113 was a lawyer, author, and magistrate of Ancient Rome. Pliny’s uncle, Pliny the Elder, helped raise and educate him.

Pliny the Younger wrote hundreds of letters, of which 247 survive, and which are of great historical value. Some are addressed to reigning emperors or to notables such as the historian Tacitus.

Pliny served as an imperial magistrate under Trajan (reigned 98–117) and his letters to Trajan provide one of the few surviving records of the relationship between the imperial office and provincial governors.

Pliny rose through a series of civil and military offices, the cursus honorum. He was a friend of the historian Tacitus and might have employed the biographer Suetonius on his staff. Pliny also came into contact with other well-known men of the period, including the philosophers Artemidorus and Euphrates the Stoic, during his time in Syria.

Pliny the Younger, the Roman governor of Bithynia and Pontus (now in modern Turkey) wrote a letter to Emperor Trajan around AD 112 and asked for counsel on dealing with the early Christian community. The letter (Epistulae X.96) details an account of how Pliny conducted trials of suspected Christians who appeared before him as a result of anonymous accusations and asks for the Emperor’s guidance on how they should be treated.

Neither Pliny nor Trajan mentions the crime that Christians had committed, except for being a Christian; and other historical sources do not provide a simple answer to what that crime could be, but most likely due to the stubborn refusal of Christians to worship Roman gods; making them appear as objecting to Roman rule.

Pliny states that he gives Christians multiple chances to affirm they are innocent and if they refuse three times, they are executed.

Pliny states that his investigations have revealed nothing on the Christians’ part but harmless practices and “depraved, excessive superstition.” However, Pliny seems concerned about the rapid spread of their practices and views Christian gatherings as a potential starting point for sedition.

The letter is the first pagan account to refer to Christianity, providing key information on early Christian beliefs and practices and how these were viewed and dealt with by the Romans. The letter and Trajan’s reply indicate that at the time of its writing there was no systematic and official persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire. 

There was persecution of Christians before this but only on a local basis, like the Neronian persecution in Rome or the expulsion of Jewish-Christians and Jews from Rome by order of Claudius. Trajan’s reply also offers valuable insight into the relationship between Roman provincial governors and Emperors and indicates that at the time Christians were not sought out or tracked down by imperial orders, and that persecutions could be local and sporadic.

Percy Crosby Channeled by Karl Mollison 12Sept2021

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Percy Crosby Channeled by Karl Mollison 12Sept2021

From http://www.skippy.com/skippy1.html

Percy Crosby December 8, 1891 – December 8, 1964

During his career as a celebrity American artist and author, Percy Crosby crusaded against corruption and stood up to the likes of Al Capone and his henchmen when American citizens were too frightened to speak out.

He used his Irish humor and gift of satire to lampoon politicians, President Roosevelt, the Ku Klux Klan, and fought for civil liberties, child labor laws, rights of veterans, and freedom of the press.

Although he made a profound impression with millions of Americans, primarily through Skippy, the loveable and mischievous cartoon character who became a household word, Percy Crosby was unable to prevent retaliation by those who coveted control of Skippy for their commercial gain, and wanted him silenced.

Percy Crosby was falsely imprisoned in a New York mental hospital for the last 16 years of his life, following years of harassment by the IRS. He referred to this period of his life as a “political witch hunt.”

During this time, Crosby’s famous Skippy trademark and its valuable goodwill was pirated by a bankrupt peanut butter company, which later merged with a Fortune 500 company, making a fortune in illicit sales under the Skippy brand name.

The true story concealed from Crosby’s heirs, aided and abetted by Percy Crosby’s lawyers, has shocked thousands of Skippy fans, collectors, consumers, artists, writers and lawyers.

Thanks to the advent of the Internet, the lawful Skippy heirs can reveal what the food pirates (Bestfoods) and their army of attorneys concealed from the courts and the public for decades, threatening to use their “political influence in Washington to keep certain doors forever shut” to Skippy’s business. Bestfoods’ legal department, apprehensive of being exposed on the Internet as the naked Emperor, has recently changed its website about its Skippy history, and compounded its conduct by engaging in willful wire fraud, a federal crime.

The familiar saying applies here: “The only way evil can prevail is for men of good will to say and do nothing.”

Anthony Bourdain Channeled by Karl Mollison 15Aug2021

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Anthony Bourdain Channeled by Karl Mollison 15Aug2021

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony_Bourdain

Anthony Michael Bourdain June 25, 1956 – June 8, 2018 was an American celebrity chef, author, and travel documentarian, who starred in programs focusing on the exploration of international culture, cuisine, and the human condition. 

Bourdain was a 1978 graduate of The Culinary Institute of America and a veteran of a number of professional kitchens during his career, which included many years spent as an executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles in Manhattan.

He first became known for his bestselling book Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (2000). His first food and world-travel television show A Cook’s Tour ran for 35 episodes on the Food Network in 2002 and 2003. In 2005, he began hosting the Travel Channel’s culinary and cultural adventure programs Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (2005–2012) and The Layover (2011–2013).

In 2013, he began a three-season run as a judge on The Taste, and concurrently switched his travelogue programming to CNN to host Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown.

Though best known for his culinary writings and television presentations, along with several books on food and cooking and travel adventures, Bourdain also wrote both fiction and historical nonfiction.

In early June 2018, Bourdain was working on an episode of Parts Unknown in Strasbourg, with his frequent collaborator and friend Éric Ripert. 

On June 8, Ripert became worried when Bourdain had missed dinner and breakfast. He subsequently found Bourdain dead of an apparent suicide by hanging in his room at Le Chambard hotel in Kaysersberg near Colmar.

Christian de Rocquigny du Fayel, the public prosecutor for Colmar, said Bourdain’s body bore no signs of violence and the suicide appeared to be an impulsive act. 

Rocquigny du Fayel disclosed that Bourdain’s toxicology results were negative for narcotics, showing only a trace of a therapeutic non-narcotic medication. 

Bourdain’s body was cremated in France on June 13, 2018, and his ashes were returned to the United States two days later.

We seemingly break new ground with the testimony from the Light Being who was Anthony Bourdain when he answers a question about the circumstances regarding his death.

Hunter S. Thompson Channeled by Karl Mollison 20June2021

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Hunter S. Thompson Channeled by Karl Mollison 20 June 2021

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hunter_S._Thompson

Hunter S. Thompson July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005 was an American journalist and author, and the founder of the gonzo journalism movement. He first rose to prominence with the publication of Hell’s Angels (1967), a book for which he spent a year living and riding with the Hells Angels motorcycle club to write a first-hand account of the lives and experiences of its members.

In 1970, he wrote an unconventional magazine feature titled “The Kentucky Derby Is Decadent and Depraved” for Scanlan’s Monthly, which both raised his profile and established him as a writer with counterculture credibility. It also set him on a path to establishing his own subgenre of New Journalism that he called “Gonzo”, which was essentially an ongoing experiment in which the writer becomes a central figure and even a participant in the events of the narrative.

Thompson remains best known for Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1971), a book first serialized in Rolling Stone in which he grapples with the implications of what he considered the failure of the 1960s counterculture movement. It was adapted on film twice: loosely in Where the Buffalo Roam starring Bill Murray as Thompson in 1980, and directly in 1998 by director Terry Gilliam in a film starring Johnny Depp and Benicio del Toro. The Doonesbury cartoon character Uncle Duke – who was modeled after Thompson – pens an essay about “my shoplifting conviction” titled “Fear and Loathing at Macy’s Menswear”, a reference to Thompson’s book.

Politically minded, Thompson ran unsuccessfully for sheriff of Pitkin County, Colorado, in 1970 on the Freak Power ticket. His run for sheriff is chronicled in the documentary film Freak Power: The Ballot or the Bomb. He became well known for his dislike of Richard Nixon, who he claimed represented “that dark, venal, and incurably violent side of the American character”. He covered Nixon’s 1972 re-election campaign for Rolling Stone and later collected the stories in book form as Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail ’72.

Thompson’s output notably declined from the mid-1970s, as he struggled with the consequences of fame, and he complained that he could no longer merely report on events, as he was too easily recognized. He was also known for his lifelong use of alcohol and illegal narcotics, his love of firearms, and his iconoclastic contempt for authoritarianism. He often remarked: “I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they’ve always worked for me.”

Thompson died by suicide at the age of 67, following a series of health problems. In accordance with his wishes, his ashes were fired out of a cannon in a ceremony funded by his friend Johnny Depp and attended by friends including then-Senator John Kerry and Jack Nicholson. Hari Kunzru wrote, “the true voice of Thompson is revealed to be that of American moralist … one who often makes himself ugly to expose the ugliness he sees around him.”

Aldous Huxley Channeled by Karl Mollison 27Sept2020

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Aldous Huxley Channeled by Karl Mollison 27Sept2020

From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Aldous-Huxley

Aldous Huxley was born July 26, 1894, Godalming, Surrey, England—died November 22, 1963, Los Angeles, California, U.S., English novelist and critic gifted with an acute and far-ranging intelligence whose works are notable for their wit and pessimistic satire. He remains best known for one novel, Brave New World (1932), a model for much dystopian science fiction that followed.

Aldous Huxley was a grandson of the prominent biologist Thomas Henry Huxley and was the third child of the biographer and man of letters Leonard Huxley; his brothers included physiologist Andrew Fielding Huxley and biologist Julian Huxley. He was educated at Eton, during which time he became partially blind because of keratitis. He retained enough eyesight to read with difficulty, and he graduated from Balliol College, Oxford, in 1916. He published his first book in 1916 and worked on the periodical Athenaeum from 1919 to 1921. Thereafter he devoted himself largely to his own writing and spent much of his time in Italy until the late 1930s, when he settled in California.

Huxley established himself as a major author with his first two published novels, Crome Yellow (1921) and Antic Hay (1923); these are witty and malicious satires on the pretensions of the English literary and intellectual coteries of his day. Those Barren Leaves (1925) and Point Counter Point (1928) are works in a similar vein.

Brave New World (1932) marked a turning point in Huxley’s career: like his earlier work, it is a fundamentally satiric novel, but it also vividly expresses Huxley’s distrust of 20th-century trends in both politics and technology. The novel presents a nightmarish vision of a future society in which psychological conditioning forms the basis for a scientifically determined and immutable caste system that, in turn, obliterates the individual and grants all control to the World State. The novel Eyeless in Gaza (1936) continues to shoot barbs at the emptiness and aimlessness experienced in contemporary society, but it also shows Huxley’s growing interest in Hindu philosophy and mysticism as a viable alternative. (Many of his subsequent works reflect this preoccupation, notably The Perennial Philosophy [1946].) In the novel After Many a Summer Dies the Swan (1939), published soon after he moved to California, Huxley turned his attention to American culture.

Huxley’s most important later works are The Devils of Loudun (1952), a detailed psychological study of a historical incident in which a group of 17th-century French nuns were allegedly the victims of demonic possession, and The Doors of Perception (1954), a book about Huxley’s experiences with the hallucinogenic drug mescaline. His last novel, Island (1962), is a utopian vision of a Pacific Ocean society.

The author’s lifelong preoccupation with the negative and positive impacts of science and technology on 20th-century life, expressed most forcefully in Brave New World but also in one of his last essays, written for Encyclopædia Britannica’s 1963 volume of The Great Ideas Today, about the conquest of space, make him one of the representative writers and intellectuals of that century.

This article was most recently revised and updated by J.E. Luebering, Executive Editorial Director.

https://archive.org/details/AldousHuxley–TheUltimateRevolutionABlueprintToEnslaveTheMasses/Aldous_Huxley–The_Ultimate_Revolution–Berkeley_Part1.mp3

Were Huxley’s dire predictions for humanity actually unwitting Extraterrestrial or ufo research? How does he see his work from his current place in the light?

R.J. Rummel Channeled by Karl Mollison 19July2020

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R.J. Rummel Channeled by Karl Mollison 19July2020

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolph_Rummel

Rudolph Joseph Rummel October 21, 1932 – March 2, 2014 was professor of political science who taught at the Indiana University, Yale University, and University of Hawaii. He spent his career studying data on collective violence and war with a view toward helping their resolution or elimination. Rummel coined the term democide for murder by government (compare genocide), such as the Stalinist purges and Mao’s Cultural Revolution.

Rummel estimated the total number of people killed by all governments during the twentieth century at 212 million, and he estimated that 148 million were killed by communist regimes from 1917 to 1987. To give some perspective on these numbers, Rummel pointed out that all domestic and foreign wars during the twentieth century killed in combat around 41 million. His figures for Communist regimes are higher than those given by most other scholars, which range from 60 to 100 million.

In his last book, Rummel increased his estimate to over 272 million innocent, non-combatant civilians who were murdered by their own governments during the twentieth century. However, Rummel noted that his 272 million death estimate was his lower, more prudent figure, stating that it “could be over 400,000,000.”

He concluded that democracy is the form of government least likely to kill its citizens and that democracies do not wage war against each other. This is known as the democratic peace theory.

Rummel was the author of twenty-four scholarly books, and published his major results in Understanding Conflict and War (1975–81). He spent the next fifteen years refining the underlying theory and testing it empirically on new data, against the empirical results of others, and on case studies. He summed up his research in Power Kills (1997). Other works include Lethal Politics: Soviet Genocides and Mass Murders 1917–1987 (1990); China’s Bloody Century: Genocide and Mass Murder Since 1900 (1991); Democide: Nazi Genocide and Mass Murder (1992); Death by Government (1994); and Statistics of Democide (1997).

Extracts, figures, and tables from the books, including his sources and details regarding the calculations, are available online on his website. Rummel also authored Factor Analysis Understanding (1970) and Understanding Correlation (1976).

In addition to his extensive research and data analysis, Rummel wrote the Never Again series of alternative-history novels, in which a secret society sends two lovers armed with fabulous wealth and modern weapons back to 1906 with orders to create a peaceful century.

Is democide the legacy of the intrinsic nature of humans or is there another explanation?

https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/978-3-319-54463-2.pdf

http://www.hawaii.edu/powerkills/RM1.PHOTOS.ROOM1.HTM

Are spiritual healing methods such as the Lightworker Healing Protocol the answer for resolving humanity’s dark history?