Osip Mandelstam Channeled by Karl Mollison 18Oct2020

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Osip Mandelstam Channeled by Karl Mollison 18Oct2020

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osip_Mandelstam

Osip Mandelstam О́сип Мандельшта́м, 14 January 1891 – 27 December 1938 was a Russian and Soviet poet. He was the husband of Nadezhda Mandelstam and one of the foremost members of the Acmeist school of poets. He was arrested by Joseph Stalin’s government during the repression of the 1930s and sent into internal exile with his wife.

In 1922, Mandelstam and Nadezhda moved to Moscow. At this time, his second book of poems, Tristia, was published in Berlin. For several years after that, he almost completely abandoned poetry, concentrating on essays, literary criticism, memoirs The Noise Of Time, Feodosiya – both 1925; (Noise of Time 1993 in English) and small-format prose The Egyptian Stamp (1928). As a day job, he translated literature into Russian (19 books in 6 years), then worked as a correspondent for a newspaper.

In the autumn of 1933, Mandelstam composed the poem “Stalin Epigram”, which he read at a few small private gatherings in Moscow. The poem was a sharp criticism of the “Kremlin highlander”. Six months later, in 1934, Mandelstam was arrested. But, after interrogation about his poem, he was not immediately sentenced to death or the Gulag, but to exile in Cherdyn in the Northern Ural, where he was accompanied by his wife. After he attempted suicide, and following an intercession by Nikolai Bukharin, the sentence was lessened to banishment from the largest cities. Otherwise allowed to choose his new place of residence, Mandelstam and his wife chose Voronezh.

This proved a temporary reprieve. In the next years, Mandelstam wrote a collection of poems known as the Voronezh Notebooks, which included the cycle Verses on the Unknown Soldier.

He also wrote several poems that seemed to glorify Stalin (including “Ode To Stalin”). However, in 1937, at the outset of the Great Purge, the literary establishment began to attack him in print, first locally, and soon after from Moscow, accusing him of harbouring anti-Soviet views.

Early the following year, Mandelstam and his wife received a government voucher for a holiday not far from Moscow; upon their arrival in May 1938, he was arrested on 5 May (ref. camp document of 12 October 1938, signed by Mandelstam) and charged with “counter-revolutionary activities”. Four months later, on 2 August 1938, Mandelstam was sentenced to five years in correction camps. He arrived at the Vtoraya Rechka (Second River) transit camp near Vladivostok in Russia’s Far East and managed to get a note out to his wife asking for warm clothes; he never received them. He died from cold and hunger. His death was described later in a short story “Sherry Brandy” by Varlam Shalamov.

Mandelstam’s own prophecy was fulfilled: “Only in Russia is poetry respected, it gets people killed. Is there anywhere else where poetry is so common a motive for murder?”

Nadezhda wrote memoirs about her life and times with her husband in Hope against Hope (1970) and Hope Abandoned. She also managed to preserve a significant part of Mandelstam’s unpublished work.

Could extraterrestrial mind control be the cause of the persecution and exile Mandelstam experienced?

 

Osip Mandelstam Channeled by Karl Mollison 18Oct2020 – AUDIO PODCAST

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Osip Mandelstam Channeled by Karl Mollison 18Oct2020

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osip_Mandelstam

Osip Mandelstam О́сип Мандельшта́м, 14 January 1891 – 27 December 1938 was a Russian and Soviet poet. He was the husband of Nadezhda Mandelstam and one of the foremost members of the Acmeist school of poets. He was arrested by Joseph Stalin’s government during the repression of the 1930s and sent into internal exile with his wife.

In 1922, Mandelstam and Nadezhda moved to Moscow. At this time, his second book of poems, Tristia, was published in Berlin. For several years after that, he almost completely abandoned poetry, concentrating on essays, literary criticism, memoirs The Noise Of Time, Feodosiya – both 1925; (Noise of Time 1993 in English) and small-format prose The Egyptian Stamp (1928). As a day job, he translated literature into Russian (19 books in 6 years), then worked as a correspondent for a newspaper.

In the autumn of 1933, Mandelstam composed the poem “Stalin Epigram”, which he read at a few small private gatherings in Moscow. The poem was a sharp criticism of the “Kremlin highlander”. Six months later, in 1934, Mandelstam was arrested. But, after interrogation about his poem, he was not immediately sentenced to death or the Gulag, but to exile in Cherdyn in the Northern Ural, where he was accompanied by his wife. After he attempted suicide, and following an intercession by Nikolai Bukharin, the sentence was lessened to banishment from the largest cities. Otherwise allowed to choose his new place of residence, Mandelstam and his wife chose Voronezh.

This proved a temporary reprieve. In the next years, Mandelstam wrote a collection of poems known as the Voronezh Notebooks, which included the cycle Verses on the Unknown Soldier.

He also wrote several poems that seemed to glorify Stalin (including “Ode To Stalin”). However, in 1937, at the outset of the Great Purge, the literary establishment began to attack him in print, first locally, and soon after from Moscow, accusing him of harbouring anti-Soviet views.

Early the following year, Mandelstam and his wife received a government voucher for a holiday not far from Moscow; upon their arrival in May 1938, he was arrested on 5 May (ref. camp document of 12 October 1938, signed by Mandelstam) and charged with “counter-revolutionary activities”. Four months later, on 2 August 1938, Mandelstam was sentenced to five years in correction camps. He arrived at the Vtoraya Rechka (Second River) transit camp near Vladivostok in Russia’s Far East and managed to get a note out to his wife asking for warm clothes; he never received them. He died from cold and hunger. His death was described later in a short story “Sherry Brandy” by Varlam Shalamov.

Mandelstam’s own prophecy was fulfilled: “Only in Russia is poetry respected, it gets people killed. Is there anywhere else where poetry is so common a motive for murder?”

Nadezhda wrote memoirs about her life and times with her husband in Hope against Hope (1970) and Hope Abandoned. She also managed to preserve a significant part of Mandelstam’s unpublished work.

 

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Become a GetWisdom Supporter and explore even more deeply the crucial information found in our channeled videos. To start with, divine wisdom just flows out of these sessions. Light beings tell us about what they see from a heavenly viewpoint. They can review past events and analyze current issues. However, Creator never allows the giving away of details that will cause harm to anyone. The Divine Realm sees no value in punishment and will not play the blame game.
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“I can tell you with complete and total sincerity from the bottom of my heart, so to speak, that my life was well worth living from just having given my few talks and telling my story. It was worth every moment of doubt and fear and physical harm done to me, including my death and the loss of my remaining years. I would gladly do it over and over again. This I will be doing in person in my next incarnation as well. I will continue to serve. The highest calling is the serving of the soul.” ~ Phil Schneider channeled by Karl Mollison 05May2017.
“In raising up the interlopers you will transcend, and that will launch you on your way into the ascension process. It will not happen unless this problem is met head-on and dealt with. That is the urgency of our message for you. It is not a misdirection or an inconvenience that can be dismissed and left to others. All have a stake in this and all have a say in what will happen next. If you choose actively or if you choose passively, you will be choosing and the consequences will ensue. Choose wisely and well and if you choose to be on the path of divine love, you will not fail.” ~ Source Creator

TRANSCRIPTIONS IN SPANISH

“Al elevar a los intrusos trascenderás, y eso te lanzará en tu camino hacia el proceso de ascensión. No sucederá a menos que este problema sea abordado, enfrentado y resuelto. Esa es la urgencia de nuestro mensaje para ti. No es un error o un inconveniente que pueda ser descartado, y dejado a otros. Todos tenéis interés en esto, y todos tenéis voz en lo que pasará después. Si eliges activamente o si eliges pasivamente, estarás eligiendo, y las consecuencias se producirán. Elige sabiamente y bien, y si eliges estar en el camino del amor divino, no fallarás.” ~ Source Creator

Joseph Stalin Channeled by Karl Mollison 14Dec2017

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Joseph Stalin Channeled by Karl Mollison 14Dec2017

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Stalin

Joseph Vissarionovich Stalin[a] (18 December 1878 – 5 March 1953) was a Georgian-born Soviet revolutionary and political leader. Governing the Soviet Union as its dictator from the mid-1920s until his death in 1953, he served as General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1922 to 1952 and as Premier of the Soviet Union from 1941 to 1953. Ideologically a Marxist and a Leninist, Stalin helped to formalise these ideas as Marxism–Leninism while his own policies became known as Stalinism.

Born to a working class family in Gori, Russian Empire, as a youth Stalin joined the Marxist Russian Social Democratic Labour Party. He edited the party newspaper Pravda and raised funds for Vladimir Lenin’s Bolshevik faction via robberies, kidnappings, and protection rackets. Repeatedly arrested, he underwent several internal exiles. After the Bolsheviks gained power in the October Revolution of 1917 and established the Russian Soviet Republic, Stalin sat on the governing Politburo during the Russian Civil War and helped form the Soviet Union in 1922. Despite Lenin’s opposition, Stalin consolidated power following the former’s death in 1924. During Stalin’s tenure, “Socialism in One Country” became a central concept in Soviet society, and Lenin’s New Economic Policy was replaced with a centralised command economy, industrialisation and collectivisation. These rapidly transformed the country into an industrial power, but disrupted food production and contributed to the famine of 1932–33, particularly affecting Ukraine. To eradicate those regarded as “enemies of the working class”, from 1934 to 1939 Stalin organised the “Great Purge” in which hundreds of thousands—including senior political and military figures—were interned in prison camps, exiled, or executed.

Stalin’s government promoted Marxism–Leninism abroad through the Communist International and supported anti-fascist movements throughout Europe during the 1930s, particularly in the Spanish Civil War. However, in 1939 they signed a non-aggression pact with Nazi Germany, resulting in their joint invasion of Poland. Germany ended the pact by invading the Soviet Union in 1941. Despite initial setbacks, the Soviet Red Army halted the German incursion and captured Berlin in May 1945, ending World War II in Europe. The Soviets annexed the Baltic states and helped establish pro-Soviet Marxist–Leninist governments throughout Eastern Europe. The Soviet Union and the United States emerged as the two world superpowers, and a period of tensions began between the Soviet-backed Eastern Bloc and U.S.-backed Western Bloc known as the Cold War. Stalin led his country through its post-war reconstruction, during which it developed a nuclear weapon. In these years, the country experienced another major famine and a period of antisemitism, which reached its peak in the 1952–1953 Doctors’ plot. Stalin died in 1953 and was succeeded by Nikita Khrushchev, who denounced his predecessor and initiated a de-Stalinisation process throughout Soviet society.

Widely considered one of the 20th century’s most significant figures, Stalin was the subject of a pervasive personality cult within the international Marxist–Leninist movement, for whom Stalin was a champion of socialism and the working class. Since the fall of the Soviet Union, Stalin has retained popularity in Russia and Georgia as a victorious wartime leader who established the Soviet Union as a major world power. Conversely, his autocratic government has been widely denounced for overseeing mass repressions, hundreds of thousands of executions and millions of non-combatant deaths through his policies.

Scholarly estimates put the total number of human deaths attributable to Stalin’s rule right around 20 millions.

Joseph Stalin did need a spirit rescue.

Questions for Joseph Stalin

1) Were you killed and replaced by a Reptilian? If so, when did this happen?

2) Did you have any warning or suspicion that something like that could happen to you?

3) Were there significant persons aligned with the Divine Realm in your circle of power who survived the purges instigated by the Reptilian Replacement?

4) What are the cultural and political influences peculiar to Russia and then the US that make it difficult for the Divine Realm to support humans? 

5) What are the Karmic ramifications for yourself in your actions leading up to your death and are there any Karmic ramifications coming to you from the actions of your replacement?

6) What were the influences and difficulties caused by your replacement within your immediate family?

7) Why was it necessary from the perspective of the ET’s working on earth to cause the deaths of 20 to 50 million people under the rule of Stalin?

8) How was the gulag methodology, where an estimated 6 million human deaths occurred, utilized in the goals of the Greys, the Reptilians, the Arcturians also known as the Nordics and then the Anunnaki?